Some good news for Adrian Peterson

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Some good news for Adrian Peterson

From Comcast SportsNetHOUSTON (AP) -- A grand jury in Houston has dismissed a misdemeanor resisting arrest charge against Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson after hearing from the four-time Pro Bowler and other witnesses.Derek Hollingsworth, one of Peterson's attorneys, said Tuesday the case stemming from Peterson's July 7 arrest outside a night club is expected to be formally dropped on Wednesday. Peterson was due in court for a pretrial hearing on Thursday before Judge Natalie Fleming.Hollingsworth said Peterson testified before the grand jury on Tuesday and found no probable cause for prosecutors to continue."It's what should've happened from the get-go," Hollingsworth said. "I'm glad it happened now."Peterson, 27, was in Houston just two days after rushing for 171 yards in the Vikings' 34-24 win over Detroit. He's rushed for more than 100 yards in four straight games and is the NFL's leading rusher this season, averaging 112.8 yards per game. The Vikings (6-4) have their open date this week.Peterson, a native of Palestine, Texas, was handcuffed and briefly jailed after the confrontation outside the club with an off-duty police officer. He was released on a 1,000 bond.Police said Peterson shoved the officer, who was working security and asked Peterson and his companions to leave the club, which was closed. Peterson said in court a week after the incident that he "didn't push, shove, touch anything to anyone that night, especially an officer."Last season, Peterson ran for 970 yards and 12 touchdowns before tearing the anterior cruciate and medial collateral ligaments in his left knee Dec. 24. The injury-shortened season broke a streak of four straight with at least 1,200 yards rushing.The former Oklahoma star was drafted seventh overall by Minnesota in 2007.

Golf legend Arnold Palmer passes away at 87

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Golf legend Arnold Palmer passes away at 87

Arnold Palmer brought a country-club sport to the masses with a hard-charging style, charisma and a commoner's touch. At ease with both presidents and the golfing public, and on a first-name basis with both, "The King," died Sunday in Pittsburgh. He was 87.

Alastair Johnson, CEO of Arnold Palmer Enterprises, confirmed that Palmer died Sunday afternoon of complications from heart problems.

Palmer ranked among the most important figures in golf history, and it went well beyond his seven major championships and 62 PGA Tour wins. His good looks, devilish grin and go-for-broke manner made the elite sport appealing to one and all. And it helped that he arrived about the same time as television moved into most households, a perfect fit that sent golf to unprecedented popularity.

Beyond his golf, Palmer was a pioneer in sports marketing, paving the way for scores of other athletes to reap in millions from endorsements. Some four decades after his last PGA Tour win, he ranked among the highest-earners in golf.

On the golf course, Palmer was an icon not for how often he won, but the way he did it.