This slugger won't play again until 2013

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This slugger won't play again until 2013

From Comcast SportsNetNEW YORK (AP) -- Toronto Blue Jays slugger Jose Bautista will have season-ending surgery to stabilize a tendon in his left wrist.Bautista said before Tuesday night's game against the New York Yankees that the recovery period is three to four months and he would be ready to play long before the start of spring training next year."There's just too much instability in that tendon and it got to the point where risking injuring the tendon was not worth it," Bautista said. "That's why we're opting to do it now."Bautista was initially injured in an at-bat against the Yankees on July 16. He chose to give rest and rehab a try and he returned from the disabled list Friday. But he says, while he did not experience any pain, he felt the tendon moving around too much and was taken out of the game against the Baltimore Orioles on Saturday. The two-time defending AL home run champion was immediately put back on the DL and sent to Cleveland to see a hand specialist.Dr. Thomas Graham will perform the operation next week in Cleveland."Luckily for me the tendon is completely intact," Bautista said. "He just needs to make it stable again."Manager John Farrell said Bautista made it through his rehabilitation program without issue. But the instability he was feeling when he returned was what prompted the recommendation for surgery."It's a definitive plan going forward," Farrell said. "The tough thing through all this is Jose never felt any discomfort but, yet, he didn't feel the strong stable feeling he typically does."Bautista spoke with Tampa Bay Rays outfielder Sam Fuld, who had similar surgery this spring after a more extended period of rest and immobilization. Bautista did not want to risk missing time next year by trying lengthy rest since it didn't work for Fuld.After a slow start in which his average didn't rise above .200 until mid-May, Bautista finished with a .241 average, 27 homers and 65 RBIs in 92 games."I didn't have the consistency I wanted to but I think I picked it up on a production level and I was able to contribute," Bautista said. "What I really wanted to do, and I said this many times, was remain healthy but unfortunately I wasn't able to."Farrell said rookie Moises Sierra would get most of the action in right field in place of Bautista until Triple-A Las Vegas' season is over and Anthony Gose returns to share playing time.

Red Sox will re-assess Rodriguez's progress after rehab start

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Red Sox will re-assess Rodriguez's progress after rehab start

CHICAGO -- Eduardo Rodriguez's return to the Red Sox rotation is going to take a little while longer.

Rodriguez will make at least one more rehab start for Pawtucket Sunday before the Red Sox re-assess his progress.

There had been some thought that Rodriguez would need only two outings on his rehab assignment. But the decision was made Wednesday to give him at least one more.

Rodriguez had a good outing for Pawtucket Tuesday night, allowing three runs on five hits in six innings of work.

All three runs came in the first inning, after which he showed improvement. "From the second to the sixth innings,'' said Farrell, "they were probably more crisp, more sharp. Looking for that to continue to advance."

Rodriguez, too, said he felt better than he did the first time out, when he allowed three runs in just 3 2/3 innings.

"I feel more control of the ball,'' he said. "I feel more comfortable throwing the ball in the game. Physically, I feel fine. I just see how everything goes every day like bullpens, running and everything. I just want to get back as fast as I can. But I want to get back 100 percent, I don't want to get back at 70 percent and go out there and don't do like I normally do."

Rodriguez, of course, has missed the first month of the season after tweaking his knee at the beginning of spring training.

"The first start I made in Pawtucket,'' recalled Rodriguez, ''I was thinking too much on my knee. Every pitch I'm throwing, I'm thinking like 'Don't push too much,' but (Tuesday) night it was every pitch I'm throwing just thinking of the game and not my knee."

After throwing 84 pitches Tuesday night, the Red Sox want him to get his pitch count over 90 in his next outing.

''I think with each outing he's getting, he's gaining more confidence and feeling more maybe natural and free on the mound," Farrell said.

 

Ainge: 'This offseason is bigger' than others for Celtics

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Ainge: 'This offseason is bigger' than others for Celtics

WALTHAM, Mass. – There was very little sizzle in the moves made by Boston during last season, one in which they were hoping would be a summer full of basketball fireworks.

Well the bar is once again set relatively high for the Celtics this offseason, one in which the chances of making an impact, fireworks-worthy deal appear to be even better now than they were a year ago.

The Celtics have Brooklyn’s first-round pick in next month’s draft that has a 15.6 percent chance of being the top overall selection, and will be no worse than the sixth overall pick.

That’s just the first of eight picks for the Celtics in next month’s draft.

Boston has the potential to shed enough salary to offer a pair of near-max contracts to free agents this summer.

“We look forward to every offseason,” said Danny Ainge, Boston’s president of basketball operations. “This offseason is bigger. My expectations are high this offseason. And yet I also know that it takes good fortune.”

There’s the NBA draft lottery later this month.

“We need some ping-pong balls to bounce our way, give us the best opportunity,” Ainge said.

The Celtics own Brooklyn’s first-round pick courtesy of the Kevin Garnett/Paul Pierce trade with Brooklyn in 2013. That pick will be no worse than the sixth overall selection this season but has a 15.6 percent chance of being the top overall selection.

“Whether we use that pick, trade that pick and … in free agency we have opportunities. That’s all we have,” Ainge said. “We have no guarantees of great things happening. We have a lot of hope. We have a lot of work ahead of us. We have to have Plan A through Z; usually it’s A through G.”