Say hello to the 2012 Tour de France champ

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Say hello to the 2012 Tour de France champ

From Comcast SportsNet
PARIS (AP) -- After making history in Paris, Tour de France champion Bradley Wiggins is heading home to London hoping to add an Olympic gold medal to go with his yellow jersey. The first Briton to win cycling's showcase event will start the Olympic time trial Aug. 1 as a big favorite for the gold, after dominating the event twice during the Tour de France. The 32-year-old Londoner showed during the Tour that he can beat all comers in the race-against-the-clock, even after 2,175 miles of racing over three weeks in one of the ultimate endurance tests in all of sports. After donning his winner's yellow jersey on the Champs-Elysees, Wiggins immediately began turning his focus to his Olympic race in just over a week. He even promised to forgo the Tour winner's traditional glass of champagne. "Everything turns to the Olympics and I'll be out on the bike tomorrow and I've got an Olympic time trial to try and win," Wiggins said. Sacrificing the traditional Tour winner's party was difficult but necessary, Wiggins said, because winning in his home Olympics "is a higher priority than anything else." "It's a little weird to leave Paris without a party because it would be nice to spend time with the team and really enjoy it," Wiggins said. Mark Cavendish, Wiggins' teammate on Team Sky, also is aiming to transition quickly from Parisian boulevards to English lanes. The world champion from Britain's Isle of Man wants to follow up his dominating sprint victory on the Champs-Elysees on Sunday with a win in the Olympic road race on July 28. If anything, Cavendish is even more heavily favored to win the road race than Wiggins is in the time trial. Regarded as the fastest man on a bike, the road world champion has not been as successful this year as in previous Tours. He kept his personal ambitions somewhat in check to put Wiggins in yellow during the Tour. He still won three stages along the way, taking his career total to 23, putting him in fourth place at the relatively young age of 27. Any other cyclist would consider that a very successful Tour, but Cavendish admitted he felt frustrated at times not being able to nab five or six stage victories as he has during his domination of sprints in recent years. Cavendish knew before the Tour this year's race would not be set up for him. He spent the first half of the season training specifically for the road race at the London Olympics, losing nine pounds (four kilograms) to be able to tackle the nine climbs of Box Hill in Surrey on Saturday. Wiggins enjoyed a perfect Tour from the start and secured the victory with a dominating performance in Saturday's final time trial to extend his already commanding lead. And with Cavendish having sacrificed some opportunities for more stage wins by helping his teammate protect the yellow jersey, Wiggins was all too happy to pay him back over the final miles of the race -- normally a time when the winner is merely cruising along and already receiving congratulations from other riders. Wiggins pulled ahead to lead the Sky train shortly before it pulled onto the Champs-Elysees for the final time as the team set Cavendish up for the sprint. "It's hard to take in as it happens," Wiggins said. "Every lap of the Champs-Elysees was goose-pimple stuff. We had a job to do with Mark today and we were all motivated to do that so it made it go a lot quicker. The concentration was high and for Mark to finish it off like that ... well, it couldn't get any better." Cavendish -- widely regarded as the best sprinter in the world -- won the final stage of the Tour for the fourth year in a row. After Wiggins pulled back, Edvald Boasson Hagen delivered the perfect lead-out for Cavendish to sprint away from his rivals at the end of the 74.6-mile stage. Cavendish accelerated coming out of the final corner, never looked back and raised four fingers as he crossed the line. "That was incredible, what a sight," Cavendish said. "The yellow jersey, Brad Wiggins pulling at the end. ... I just gave everything to the line, I wanted it so bad. It's the cherry on top of an amazing Tour for us." The seven stage wins was a record haul for British riders in the Tour, beating the previous record of six stage wins -- all by Cavendish -- in 2009. This time the victories were divided up between Cavendish (3), Wiggins (2), David Millar (1) and Christopher Froome (1). All four, with Ian Stannard, will compete in Saturday's road race on the opening day of the Olympics with the aim of propelling Cavendish to another triumph. "We won seven stages in total, that's one out of three stages won by a British rider," Cavendish said. "The guys in the Olympic team have one more job to do, but it's been an incredible few weeks for us."

Quotes, notes and stars: Fourth inning 'a grind' for Porcello

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Quotes, notes and stars: Fourth inning 'a grind' for Porcello

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- Quotes, notes and stars from the Red Sox' 8-2 win over Tampa Bay

 

QUOTES

"I can't say enough about the way our position players have continued to grind away. . . Tonight was just another example of that.'' - John Farrell.

"He's been everything that we could have hoped. You look to a starting pitcher to go out and be consistent every fifth day -- he's been a model of that for us.'' - Farrell on Rick Porcello.

"It's nice to come back with a statement game tonight. The past couple of week haven't been good for us, so it was nice to get back on the right track tonight.'' - Travis Shaw.

"Preventing them from scoring first was big and then limiting the big inning. The fourth inning was a grind. I dug myself a hole and had to find a way out of it.'' - Rick Porcello.

 

NOTES

* Rick Porcello became the first Red Sox starter to record a win since David Price beat Seattle on Jume 19.

* Porcello is unbeaten over his last eight starts, going 3-0 with five no-decisions.

* Porcello had gone 19 straight starts without allowing more than two walks, the longest such streak for a Red Sox starter since Curt Schilling went 33 in a row.

* The Red Sox snapped a three-game losing streak and are one of two teams (Cleveland is the other) to not have lost four straight this season.

* Boston has a major league-leading 22 games in which it has scored eight or more runs.

* The first six hitters in the Red Sox lineup were 11-for-24, while the bottom three were a combined 0-for-13.

* Travis Shaw's home run was measured at 449 feet, the second-longest homer by a Red Sox player this season.

* In one night, Travis Shaw had more RBI (five) than he had in his previous 27 games (four).

* David Ortiz tied Frank Thomas in career RBI (1,704); both are in 23rd place.

 

STARS

1) Travis Shaw

Shaw belted out three hits -- including his first homer in the month of June -- and knocked in five RBI, tying a career high.

2) Rick Porcello

In a perfect world, Porcello would have gone a little deeper, but kept the Rays off the scoreboard early and helped set the tone for the night.

3) Hanley Ramirez

Ramirez reached base five times with two hits -- both singles -- and three walks - one intentional - and seemed to be in the middle of every Red Sox rally.

 

First impressions: Red Sox bounce back with 8-2 win

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First impressions: Red Sox bounce back with 8-2 win

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- First impressions from the Red Sox' 8-2 win over the Tampa Bay Rays:

 

Rick Porcello gave the Red Sox everything they needed - except for that fourth inning.

On the current road trip, the Red Sox starters had been knocked around regularly, getting knocked out of the box early. The bullpen was overworked and the offense demoralized from being down early, night after night.

Beyond allowing a two-out double to Evan Longoria, Porcello pitched a virtually incident-free first inning and really wasn't pressured through the first three innings.

In the fourth, his command essentially disappeared, as he issued three walks, the last of which came with the bases loaded, forcing in a run. But with the bases loaded and just one out, Porcello toughened, retiring Logan Forsythe on a flyout to shallow right, then slipping a called third strike past Brad Miller.

The inning took its toll as far as elevating Porcello's pitch count, with 39 pitches needed. That eventually cost him an inning, but he got through six frames and allowed just one run.

All things considered, it was one of the most important starts of the season for a Red Sox pitcher.

 

Even on nights when he's not contributing at the plate, Bryce Brentz helps out with his glove.

Brentz has been a nice surprise at the plate since being called up last week when the Red Sox ran out of left fielders, with seven hits in his first four games.

On Tuesday, he was hitless with three stirkeouts, but he made a terrific sliding catch in the sixth, coming on to make a sliding grab on a sinking liner from Nick Franklin.

Brentz has always been well thought of as a defender in the outfield with a strong arm, and for past week, he's shown that with a number of fine plays in left.

 

There was an obvious sense of urgency to the Red Sox

You could sense it as Hanley Ramirez scored from first on a double by Jackie Bradley Jr. in the fifth. Or the hustle shown by Bradley in the seventh, going first-to-home with a slide to score on a double by Travis Shaw.

You could see it -- and hear it -- when Porcello pitched out of his bases-loaded, one-out jam in the fourth. Porcello let loose with a primal scream as he got Brad Miller on a called third strike, stranding three baserunners.

It's hard to label a game in late June as a "must win'' but given how the first four games of this road trip have played out, this was close. And the Red Sox responded.

 

OFFSEASON

Future uncertain for Johnson and Jerebko as Celtics pursue Durant

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Future uncertain for Johnson and Jerebko as Celtics pursue Durant

BOSTON -- When you’re the Boston Celtics and you have your sights set on a star like Kevin Durant, the potential impact on your roster is undeniable.

That’s a good thing, right?

Well . . . not exactly.

One of the options that the Celtics are considering during the free agency period is whether to waive Amir Johnson and Jonas Jerebko before July 3 which would create additional salary cap space to potentially sign Durant and another near max-salaried player.

But here’s the problem.

Boston could potentially waive Johnson and Jerebko, fail to get Durant or another elite free agent and see the duo gone for nothing in return while they play their way into a big contract toiling in the NBA’s basement with one of the league’s worst teams.

How you ask?

Multiple league sources contacted by CSNNE.com Tuesday night indicated that if the Celtics waive both players, it’s “very likely” that both will be claimed off waivers.

According to a league office official, waiver priority goes to the team with the worst record attempting to claim a player.

And what team had the worst record in the NBA last season?

Yup. The 10-win Philadelphia 76ers.

And what team was right behind them, or ahead depending on how you look at things?

The lowly, 17-win Los Angeles Lakers.

Johnson is due $12 million next season while Jerebko is due to earn $5 million, chump change in this new age of the NBA with the 2016-2017 salary cap expected to be around $94 million.

In addition, both players would join clubs in contract years. Couple that with each being relatively productive and there’s the potential for each player to have a really big season.

Johnson was the Celtics’ top rim-protector last season, in addition to being a solid pick-and-roll defender. He also averaged 7.3 points, 6.4 rebounds with 1.7 assists and 1.1 blocked shots per game. 

And Jerebko shot 39.8 percent from 3-point range last season, and finished up the playoffs in the starting lineup.

The Celtics are well aware of how valuable both players were to Boston’s success last season, and how their production relative to their contracts makes them extremely important to whatever team they play for.

To lose them for what would essentially be a lottery ticket in the Durant sweepstakes, is certainly a gamble that it remains to be seen if the Celtics are willing to take.

Best-case scenario for Boston is to know where they stand with Durant within the first 24 hours of free agency which would then allow them time to make a more informed decision about Johnson and Jerebko’s futures.

As you can imagine, the Celtics are as eager as any team to know what Durant plans to do this summer.

Because the way things are starting to take shape with Boston’s pursuit of the former league MVP, he’s going to have an impact on the Celtics’ roster one way or another.