Rockies' Tracy resigns after franchise-worst season

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Rockies' Tracy resigns after franchise-worst season

From Comcast SportsNetDENVER (AP) -- Colorado Rockies manager Jim Tracy resigned Sunday, stepping down after the team set a franchise record for losses.The Rockies said a search for Tracy's replacement would begin immediately but they have no time frame for making a hire. Colorado finished last in the NL West this year while going 64-98.Tracy was promoted from bench coach to manager in May 2009. He was voted the NL Manager of the Year that season after guiding Colorado into the playoffs.The Rockies went 294-308 under Tracy."I was surprised," Bill Geivett, the team's director of major league operations, told The Associated Press. "You know, Jim and I go back a long time. We worked together for three different clubs."Basically, Tracy called me and told me his intentions and we talked about a lot of different things, but he had already made up his mind," said Geivett, who also worked with Tracy in Montreal and Los Angeles.Energized by the young players and the challenge of fixing things, Tracy had said repeatedly the last several weeks that he wanted to fulfill the final year on his contract in 2013. But he changed his mind after meeting with Geivett for several hours on Friday and then mulling those discussions over the weekend.Asked why Tracy resigned, Geivett said: "I don't think there was any one thing in particular that seemed to stand out, but you'd have to ask him that."Tracy didn't return phone calls and texts from the AP.Geivett said he wanted Tracy to return next season."I mean, that's how I started our meeting on Friday, that he was the manager of the club," Geivett said. "Like I said, it was surprising."Geivett, however, didn't try to change Tracy's mind."His decision was made when he called me and I respected that," Geivett said.Geivett said he had no timetable for hiring a new manager: "All the focus has been on Jim Tracy the last few days here and I just got the call today, so we'll start to formulate a plan."The Rockies will be the fourth team to change managers this year. Boston fired Bobby Valentine, Cleveland dismissed Manny Acta and Houston let go Brad Mills.Things changed for Tracy on Aug. 1 when Geivett, the assistant general manager, was given an office in the clubhouse and began focusing on roster management, particularly as it related to the pitchers, and evaluating the coaching staff and the rest of the players. Tracy's responsibilities were narrowed to game management and meeting with the media."I thought we worked together fine," Geivett said. "I don't think at any time since Aug. 1 or even before that, we've had some type of difficulty working together."Geivett said that structure will remain in place next season but he said he didn't think that would be an issue in his search for a new manager, either.In addition to altering their front office, with general manager Dan O'Dowd focusing his attention on the minor leagues and player development, the Rockies last summer adopted a radical four-man rotation and a 75-pitch limit with several designated piggyback relievers, an experiment that lasted two months.Geivett said the Rockies will return to a traditional five-man rotation next season with pitch limits determined on a case-by-case basis, "although I don't think we'll ever go back to the days of 120 pitches.""I'm sure it'll come up" in the search for a new manager, Geivett said of the four-man, 75-pitch experiment. "But I mean, I don't see that being a major topic of conversation, to tell you the truth, because we're not doing it."Tracy, the fifth manager in club history, was given an indefinite contract extension last spring but it guaranteed only his 2013 salary of 1.4 million as field manager and really just represented the organization's desire to keep him in the organization in some capacity.Geivett said he hasn't met with members of Tracy's coaching staff to discuss their futures in Colorado."Any time you change the manager, things can change," Geivett said. "Right now, it's all undecided. But we do have coaches that it would be our intention to retain."

Bruins lose Stempniak, Eriksson, others in free agency

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Bruins lose Stempniak, Eriksson, others in free agency

The Bruins lost a number of free agents on after the market opened at noontime. None bigger than Loui Eriksson signing a six-year, $36 million contract with the Vancouver Canucks to play with the Sedin Twins.

It’s the exact level of term and salary that Eriksson said he was looking for from the Bruins in contract negotiations around the trade deadline, but the Bruins never really moved from their offer of a four-year deal at comparable money.

The Bruins will miss the 30-goal production and solid all-around, two-way play from Eriksson as he heads to the West Coast, but they also traded in a passive player in Eriksson for an in-your-face, physical leader in David Backes on a five-year deal. 

Backes is much more of a Bruins-style player than Eriksson could have ever hoped to have been. That part of it is a win for a Bruins fan base that wants intensity and physicality from their players.

The Bruins also watched Jonas Gustavsson sign a one-year, $800,000 contract with Peter Chiarelli and the Edmonton Oilers, Brett Connolly sign a one-year deal for $850,000 with the Washington Capitals, Zach Trotman signs a one-year deal for $950,000 and Lee Stempniak ink a two-year, $5 million contract with the Carolina Hurricanes after being a non-contract training camp invite with New Jersey last season.

Sweeney had maintained as late as Thursday that he was still keeping ties with many of Boston’s free agents prior to the noon opening of the free agent market, but clearly that’s changed.

“We’ll continue to have talks and sort of figure out where things may go. We’ve had talks with a number of players to see what they would like to see as the opportunity here or what we see as a fit,” said Sweeney on the Torey Krug conference call on Thursday night. “I haven’t ruled absolutely any of that out; just haven’t found common ground and obviously it gets harder and harder as we go further along in the process.”
 

OFFSEASON

Evan Turner agrees to 4-year, $70M deal with Trail Blazers

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Evan Turner agrees to 4-year, $70M deal with Trail Blazers

BOSTON — We have heard how good a coach Brad Stevens has been for the Celtics.

And then Evan Turner goes out and lands a four-year, $70 million deal from the Portland Trail Blazers, which says more about Stevens than the crazy NBA free agency market.

Remember, it was just two years ago that Turner was a player that hardly anyone wanted.

Sure, he put up big numbers in his final season in Philadelphia before they traded him, but the Sixers were still a bad team.

And when he arrived in Indiana, the Pacers seemed to regress which on the eve of free agency, led to Turner’s stock taking an Enron-like plunge.

So, in came the Celtics, offering him two-year, $6.9 million contract and with it a chance to change the narrative of him as being a lottery pick bust.

Instead of being a bust, Turner blossomed into a reliable, jack-of-all-trades who could impact the game positively off the bench or in the starting lineup.

And while Turner certainly deserves a lot of credit for turning his basketball career around, it’s also yet another testament to what Stevens can do for veterans in need of a image makeover (read: Dwight Howard).

Kris Humphries was on the Celtics’ 2013-2014 squad which was Stevens’ first season as an NBA coach.

Humphries was part of the Paul Pierce/Kevin Garnett trade with Brooklyn, a player whose contract was viewed as being as valuable as he was as a player.

There were rumors all the way up to the trade deadline that Boston would move him and his expiring contract.

Instead, they kept him around and gradually Stevens found ways to get him in the game, allow him to do some things on the floor that he had not done before.

So, rather than having to settle for a veteran’s minimum contract which seemed to be in his future, his play under Stevens led to a three-year, $13 million deal with Washington.

Humphries credits Stevens’ system as being one of the keys to his success and ability to land a decent, multi-year contract following a season in which Boston won just 25 games and he shot a career-best 50.1 percent from the field.

“If you look at a lot of guys, they have a lot of versatility in their game,” Humphries told CSNNE.com in April. “They’re able to handle the ball more than they have throughout their careers, show they can do more in terms of being an overall player. That helps guys with the NBA today, 1 [point guard] through 5 [center] has to be able to make plays. Brad’s system lets you do that.”

Especially for players like Humphries and Turner, who parlayed success under Stevens into a huge payday.

 

Red Sox activate Brock Holt off DL, will start in LF

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Red Sox activate Brock Holt off DL, will start in LF

After being out with a concussion since May 20, Brock Holt has been activated by the Red Sox and will start in left field in the opener of the three-game series with the Angels. 

Infielder Mike Miller was optioned back to Triple-A Pawtucket to make room for Holt on the roster.

Holt was hitting .239 with three homers and 19 RBI before he was injured. He hit .320 (8-for-25) in an eight-game rehab stint for the PawSox.