Red Sox lose fourth straight, 7-4 to White Sox

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Red Sox lose fourth straight, 7-4 to White Sox

By Sean McAdam
CSNNE.com

BOSTON -- Whatever momentum the Red Sox built on their recent 5-2 road trip has since been squandered by the poor start to the club's homestand.

The Red Sox dropped their fourth straight -- and third in a row at Fenway -- 7-4, to the Chicago White Sox, who arrived in Boston Monday seven games under .500 but scored 24 runs in sweeping Boston.

The Red Sox had a 3-0 after two innings thanks to an RBI double from Jed Lowrie and a two-run single from Jarrod Saltalamacchia.

But the White Sox clawed back against Tim Wakefield with one run in the fourth, two in the fifth and another in the sixth.

David Ortiz's second homer in as many games tied things at 4-4 in the bottom of the sixth, but the White Sox netted a run off Matt Albers in the seventh then padded the lead on a two-run homer from Paul Konerko off closer Jonathan Papelbon in the ninth.

Lefty reliever Rich Hill, who has not allowed a run this season, grabbed his left forearm in pain after walking Adam Dunn in the seventh game and immediately left the game.

STAR OF THE GAME: Paul Konerko
Konerko delivered a run-scoring single off Matt Albers in the seventh to snap a 4-4 tie and two innings later, he added a two-run homer off Jonathan Papelbon to provide some extra padding for the White Sox.

Konerko has driven in runs in each of his last five games, including, obviously, all three of the games against the Red Sox.
HONORABLE MENTION: Gavin Floyd
Floyd was roughed up for seven innings in the first two innings, but settled down thereafter, allowing just two more hits the rest of the way.

He retired 10 consecutive batters from the second through the fifth while his teammates caught up at the plate and improved to 5-0 lifetimes against the Red Sox.

GOAT OF THE GAME: Matt Albers
After David Ortiz had tied the game with a solo homer in the bottom of the sixth and taken starter Tim Wakefield off the hook, Albers came in and faced four hitters, allowing three hits, a run and a wild pitch.
TURNING POINT
After the Red Sox had seven hits in their first 10 plate appearances, Floyd made some adjustments and allowed just one hit over the next 18 hitters.

BY THE NUMBERS
Over the last 18 games, Red Sox catchers (Jarrod Saltalamacchia and Jason Varitek) have combined to knock in 15 runs.

QUOTE OF NOTE
"I thought it was a poor call and a poor explanation. I asked him to get help. He said it was his call. I wish he'd gotten it right.'' - Terry Francona on 2nd base umpire Marty Foster, who called Juan Pierre safe despite replays showing that Dustin Pedroia tagged Pierre attempting to steal second.

Sean McAdam can be reached at smcadam@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Sean on Twitter at http:twitter.comsean_mcadam

Francona, Epstein receive grand ovations at BBWAA dinner

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Francona, Epstein receive grand ovations at BBWAA dinner

BOSTON -- “I didn’t feel that love after I made a pitching change in the sixth inning,” Terry Francona said after a 45-second standing ovation from Boston fans upon receiving the MLB Manager of the Year award from the BBWAA Thursday.

It’s without question the love for Francona runs deep in the city. Why wouldn’t it? He was the leader in breaking the 86-year old curse, and wound up winning another World Series title for Boston three years later.

Actually, he was more of a co-leader, working alongside the same person who won the MLB Executive of the Year honors from the BBWAA for 2016.

Theo Epstein -- who received an ovation 17 seconds shorter than Francona, but who’s counting -- reminisced about the Red Sox ownership group that took a chance on a young kid who wasn’t necessarily the ideal candidate to take over as GM of a team, but now that’s helped him build the Chicago Cubs into a winning franchise and establish a great working environment.

This October marks 13 years since the ’04 championship, 10 years since ’07 and six years since the pair left Boston. Without question they’ve left their mark on the city and forever changed Red Sox baseball.

And while the fans showed their undying gratitude for Francona with an ovation almost as long as his acceptance speech, the Indians manager recognized the favor the current Red Sox brass has done for him.

“I’d like to thank Dave Dombrowski and the Red Sox for getting Chris Sale the hell out of the Central Division,” Francona said.