Red Sox introduce 'ecstatic' Victorino

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Red Sox introduce 'ecstatic' Victorino

BOSTON Saying he is ecstatic, Shane Victorino was introduced Thursday afternoon at Fenway Park as the newest member of the Red Sox.

Victorino joined the Sox as a free agent, signing a three-year, 39 million contract. A switch-hitter, Victorino has hit .275, with a .341 on-base percentage, and a .430 slugging percentage in 1,076 games over his nine-season career. He is expected to play right field, where he has appeared in just 148 of his 1,002 defensive games over his career, with Jacoby Ellsbury in center and Jonny Gomes in left.

Calling this home for the next three years, I'm ecstatic, said Victorino, who will wear No. 18. Looking forward to an opportunity to go out there and play right field, or wherever manager John Farrell wants me to play, Im more than ecstatic.

Shane fits perfectly into our short- and longer-term plan, said general manager Ben Cherington. Hes been a big part of great teams. Hes a guy that can do a lot of things on the baseball field. A great defender, a great baserunner, hitter from both sides of the plate, and one of the highest-energy players in the game.

For Victorino, who turned 32 on Nov. 30, this is his first time playing with an American League team. He was a sixth-round pick of the Dodgers in 1999, but was taken by the Padres in the 2002 Rule 5 draft, making his big league debut with San Diego in 2003. He was returned to the Dodgers in May 2003, though. In 2004, he was again taken in the Rule 5 draft, by Philadelphia, where he played until being traded to the Dodgers at the trading deadline in July.

Factoring into the Sox decision to pursue Victorino as a free agent is the on-going endeavor to improve the clubhouse culture, going after high-character players, along with his on-field abilities, Cherington said.

Were always looking at the body of work and the longer track record, said Cherington. I think Shane would say there were some times last year he didnt feel quite the way he wanted to. But what we wanted to do this offseason, as you guys know, is not just add to the outfield but add to the outfield with a guy whos a centerfield-quality defender. And if we can do that with a guy who can also hit and run the bases and add the energy that Shane does, we just felt like it was a really good fit for a lot of good reasons. We know the kind of player hes been over a period of time. Hes still young. Hes still in his prime age years. Looking forward to seeing him out here. And hes a big part of what were trying to do.

Despite the Sox disastrous 2012 season and problems in the clubhouse, Victorino said he needed no convincing to join the team.

"There is no convincing, he said. It's Boston. That in itself says it all. It's the Red Sox.Its a storied franchise. I think still, to me, if you look around the game of baseball, theres one rivalry that you speak of and thats the Yankees and Red Sox.

I look at the guys, the chemistry on this team... I look at the makeup of the team, the guys. This is one of those things we can turn around. And that's the goal. We don't want to be known as the team that didn't make the playoffs. I want to be a team that makes the playoffs.I fell short last year and it wasnt fun to be home in October.

The reason I chose the Red Sox over other organizations, the tradition, the history, the makeup of the team. The last couple years has been definitely tough for the Boston organization. But at the end of the day we look beyond that now. We need to look forward to 2013 and being that organization that we can be. The game of baseball is the game of baseball. It happens sometimes like that and you can't put a finger on it."

In addition to a new team and a new league, Victorino will be making some adjustments in his defensive position. He has played the vast majority of his defensive games 762 in center field. He played just one game in right field in 2012, with the Dodgers, where he also played 48 games in left and eight in center.

I did the same thing when I went to LA," Victorino said of changing positions. People talked about how I should be the center fielder going there. But I always look at it as, 'Im going to help this team win'. I came in as a right fielder ...If you speak to Phillies manager Charlie Manuel, you can ask him. He thinks I was the best right fielder that ever played.

Don't get me wrong, I love center field. I want to be a center fielder. But Ive played right. I'm excited for the opportunity to just go out there and have fun. I still might wrap myself around that pole. But if Ive got to go get a ball, Im going to go get it.

Fenways expansive right field will present a challenge for Victorino.

Its a big right field. But Im always up to the challenge, he said. Im going to work hard in spring training to get that opportunity. Im going to get that opportunity in spring training to work with Jacoby in center field, and playing with two center fielders I can trust his legs. Playing in our home ballpark you dont have to worry about a left fielder too much with that wall out there. We can both kind of shift over.

Ive already spoken with Ellsbury. Were very excited to play alongside each other.

Playing in Boston should be less of an adjustment for him, having played in large markets with high expectations.

I hope it is not worse than Philly, he said, with a laugh. That was a pretty tough marketI learned through that experience too, what its like to be in a market where youre not that team, that number one teamIm going to try and stay positive. I think thats important. But its the fans. Its the tradition thats in this place, the Green Monster, Fenway, all these things.

Blakely: Blown call didn't cost Celtics the game Saturday vs. Blazers

Blakely: Blown call didn't cost Celtics the game Saturday vs. Blazers

WALTHAM -- You won’t find the Boston Celtics blaming anyone but themselves for Saturday’s 127-123 overtime loss to Portland. 
 
But they certainly didn’t get any breaks down the stretch from the referees, who made a huge officiating mistake in the final seconds of regulation. 

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Following a Celtics miss in the game’s closing seconds, Blazers guard Damian Lillard wound up with the ball but was stripped almost immediately by Marcus Smart, who put the steal back in for a lay-up that would have given Boston a one-point lead with 10.8 seconds to play. 
 
The ruling on the floor at the time was a foul against Smart. But officials later determined as part of their report on the final two minutes of the game, that the foul against Smart was an incorrect call.
 
“It just pisses you off, doesn’t it?” Crowder said. “It just pisses you off. I don’t like it.”
 
Crowder, like a number of players I have spoken to about this particular subject, is not a fan of the league releasing the information. 
 
And his reasoning, like his NBA brethren, is simple. 
 
There’s no recourse relative to that particular game if the officials in fact got a call wrong. 
 
So for their purposes, the transparency that the league is seeking, while just, doesn’t do them a damn bit of good when it comes to what matters most to them. Which is wins and losses. 
 
“It’s over now. It’s too late to confirm it now,” said Smart who told media following the loss that the steal was clean. “The game is over with. It is what it is; on to the next game now.”
 
Smart added that having the league confirm the call was wrong is frustrating. 
 
“They come back and tell you they miss the call, but it’s over now,” Smart said. “We’re on to the next game. It’s like they shouldn’t even said it. But I understand it; they’re trying to take responsibility and show they made a bad call. We appreciate it but at that time as a player it’s frustrating. That possibly could have won us the game.”
 
But as Smart, coach Brad Stevens and other players asked about it mentioned, Boston made so many mistakes against the Blazers and played so uncharacteristically for long stretches that it would be unfair and just not right to pin the game’s outcome on one bad call late in the game. 
 
“It happens,” said Stevens who added that he’s never read a two-minute report other than what he has seen published by the media. “There were plenty of things we could have done better.”
 
He’s right.
 
That blown call didn’t cost the Boston Celtics the game. 
 
Their play did. 
 
The Celtics turned the ball over 21 times that led to 34 points, both season highs. 
 
They couldn’t contain C.J. McCollum and Damian Lillard, two of the league’s most explosive guards who combined for 63 points on 20-for-42 shooting.
 
Boston allowed Myers Leonard to score a season-high 17 points. 
 
Certainly the bad call against Smart was a factor. 
 
But it would not have been an issue if the Celtics had done a better job of controlling the things they could have controlled, like defending shooters better, making smarter decisions when it came to passing the ball and maybe most significant, play with a higher, more consistent level of aggression around the rim. 

Bradley, Green and Jackson to miss Celtics' game Tuesday against Wizards

Bradley, Green and Jackson to miss Celtics' game Tuesday against Wizards

WALTHAM -- The team flight to Washington for tomorrow night's game against the Wizards will be a little lighter than the Celtics would like. 
 
Boston continues to be cautious with Avery Bradley and his right Achilles strain injury. Coach Brad Stevens confirmed that the 6-foot-2 guard won't travel and will sit out for the seventh time in the last eight games. 

Stevens added he didn't anticipate Bradley returning to the court anytime this week, which means he's likely not to return until next week's game against Detroit on Jan. 30. 
 
Bradley won’t be the only Celtic not making the trip for health-related reasons. Gerald Green and Demetrius Jackson are both not traveling due to sickness. 
 
However, the Celtics did get a bit of good news on the health front. Jonas Jerebko and Tyler Zeller, both having missed games with sickness, will take the trip to D.C. with the rest of their teammates.