Patriots working to eliminate last-second scores

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Patriots working to eliminate last-second scores

The Baltimore Ravens have recently enjoyed sneaking in a punch before the bell.
Last Saturday against Denver, quarterback Joe Flacco turned the tide with a lightning-quick drive. It looked certain Baltimore would enter the break down 21-14 to the Broncos. But any offensive frustration from earlier in the half disappeared as Flacco completed passes of 11, 15, and 32 yards to get the Ravens into the end zone. The game-tying drive took all of 40 seconds.
Which is longer than the "series" that tied the game at the end of regulation.
With Denver up 35-28 and 31 seconds to play. After one incomplete pass and a 7-yard rush, the Ravens were facing third-and-3 from the 30 and had zero timeouts to work with. Flacco threw up a 70-yard prayer that flew faster and farther down the sideline than a pair of Denver defenders and got caught by receiver Jacoby Jones.
The Patriots have watched the film.
"We never want to do that," head coach Bill Belichick said. "We always think that the end of the half can get a little different than the rest of the game because of situational play and also sometimes offensively teams change their method of attack and what theyre doing and how theyre doing it and that kind of thing. So you have to adapt and adjust to what they do."
As the Ravens are enjoying their last-second scores, New England has been allowing them.
The Patriots had a 17-3 lead in last weekend's Divisional Playoff against Houston with more than three minutes left before halftime. Quarterback Matt Schaub used more than half of the time to drive his team 47 yards on five plays for a touchdown. The series made it a one-possession game.
"We have to do what were doing better," Belichick said. "Its definitely a point of emphasis and Im sure it will be important in this game. Well definitely work on it."
Belichick doesn't think his defense let down its emotional guard when the Texans scored before the break. He said it's not so much about the Patriots failing to maintain their mental toughness as it is about execution. Plain and simple."We were trying to do the right things and we did some things that were good, but then we did some other things that werent as good as they need to be. Houston was able to take advantage of some of the things we were doing."
A sense of urgency is added now as there's no next week's game to fix problems for. Allowing those touchdowns, as the Patriots did for Houston, won't fly against Baltimore.
"Its a combination of better coaching, better playing, maybe better preparation, and hopefully it will be better this week."

Edelman says 'there was no maliciousness' to his Steelers comments

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Edelman says 'there was no maliciousness' to his Steelers comments

It's funny how during a week like this one, a singularly ridiculous act -- such as Antonio Brown's live stream of the Steelers postgame locker room celebration last weekend -- can lead to a series of brush fires that pop up only to be peed on and put out. 

That was the case yesterday as a comment Julian Edelman made to WEEI earlier this week about Brown's Facebook Live video was spun as a sort of vicious burn directed at the Steelers franchise. 

"That's how that team is run," Edelman said, a comment that read as a more serious indictment than it actually sounded. "I personally don't think that would be something that would happen in our locker room, but hey, whatever. Some people like red and some people like blue. Some people like tulips and some people like roses. Whatever."

That led to Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger being asked about Edelman's comments, and defending the honor of the Rooney family, during a press conference on Wednesday.

"I don’t think I need to speak much," Roethlisberger said. "We’ve got our trophies out there. I’ve got owners that I think are the best in the business. They’re family to us, and I’m sure if he talked to his owner, he would say the same thing about the Rooneys. Anybody in here in the football world or the regular world that owns the Rooneys knows what they stand for. It’s a blessing to call them a family."

And on and on it went. Later in the day, Edelman was asked about his comments during a conference call with Pittsburgh reporters.

So just in case you're keeping score, a Steelers player streamed a video of coach Mike Tomlin calling the Patriots "a-holes," which prompted a response from Edelman. That response prompted a response from Roethlisberger, whose response to the response then led to a response to the response to the response from Edelman.

Got it?

"Yeah, I mean I think it was taken out of context," Edelman said. "I have nothing but respect for the Pittsburgh Steelers. They’re an unbelievable franchise. It starts from the top with the Rooney Family, Coach Tomlin, I think they just mis[interpreted] – I mean, I don’t know, I may have said it, but I think more of that was that it’s not the way we would do it here. That’s just how that goes. There was no maliciousness about it, but it’s whatever. That’s what the media does, try to make stories."