Patriots romp past Jets, 49-19

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Patriots romp past Jets, 49-19

Rex Ryan arrived in New York four years ago promising -- with colorful, I-didn't-come-here-to-kiss-Bill-Belichick's-rings language -- to put an end to the Jets' role of nail to the Patriots' hammer. And for a while, he delivered.

There was New York's upset victory over New England at the Meadowlands in 2009 in Ryan's second game as coach. Then there was the Jets' playoff win in Foxboro the following season, Ryan's third conquest of Belichick in five meetings . . . and one which propelled his team to its second straight AFC Championship Game.

The Jets would lose that AFC title game, just as they did the year before, and it's been mostly downhill since then. And on a mild Thanksgiving night at MetLife Stadium, the ride may have come to an end, if not now then certainly at the end of the season, for Rex Ryan . . . at the hands of the man whose rings he hadn't come to kiss.

Belichick's Patriots humiliated Ryan's self-destructing Jets on national television, taking advantage of four New York turnovers and scoring three touchdowns in a span of 52 seconds in the second quarter as they raced out to a 35-3 halftime lead. The eventual 49-19 pounding probably ended the Jets' playoff hopes and may have sealed Ryan's fate.

Owner Woody Johnson has already expressed his displeasure at how New York's season has unfolded, and Thursday night's outcome -- which drops the Jets' record to 4-7, four games behind the 8-3 Pats with five to play -- could mean the end of the reign of Ryan and general manager Mike Tannenbaum. A new era will begin, replacing one that started so promisingly back in '09.

And ended so horribly in '12.

The carnage began in routine enough style, with a two-yard scoring pass from Tom Brady to Wes Welker on the first play of the second quarter capping a six-minute, 15-play, 84-yard drive that gave New England a 7-0 lead. The Jets drove into Patriots territory on their next possession, but -- in a harbinger of things to come -- the Pats stuffed Bilal Powell on a fourth-and-one from the 31 and Powell coughed up the football. It rolled a little more than 10 yards and Steve Gregory recovered on the 17.

What followed was the most amazing 52 seconds of this long and sometimes bitter rivalry:

On the next play, Brady hit Shane Vereen with a screen pass in the left flat and -- amazingly -- Vereen raced untouched 83 yards down the sideline for a touchdown. Speaking on CSNNE.com's Web-only halftime show, ex-Patriots star Troy Brown said he'd never seen, at any level of football, a player run 80 yards on a swing pass out of the backfield without anyone laying a hand on him.

On the second play of the next series, Jets quarterback Mark Sanchez tried to make something of a broken play by taking the ball himself up the middle. But he ran into the backside of his own guard, Brandon Moore, fumbled, and Gregory scooped the ball and raced 32 yards for a touchdown.

Then, on the ensuing kickoff, Joe McKnight lost the ball at the 20-yard line when he was hit by Devin McCourty. Julian Edelman plucked it out of the air and ran it in from 22 yards out.

In 52 seconds, the Patriots had increased their lead from 7-0 to 28-0. They would make it 35-0 when Brady found Edelman behind the Jets' secondary for a 56-yard touchdown with 3:08 to play in the half.

Game. Set. Match.

There were still 33 minutes or so to go, and the Jets managed to score the next 12 points to regain a little self-respect at 35-12 in the third quarter. That self-respect disappeared when the Pats scored twice in the final period, on a one-yard sneak by Brady (capping an 87-yard drive) and a nine-yard run by Stevan Ridley (after yet another Jets fumble) to make it 49-12. New York scored one final TD for the 49-19 final.

When it was over, it was hard to remember a time -- and just two years ago, no less -- when these Jets were considered to be not only the Patriots' equal, but even their successors as the powers of the AFC East.

It was fun while it lasted. But in the end, the hammer always wins.

Scott's taste of big-league life with Red Sox has him hungering for more

Scott's taste of big-league life with Red Sox has him hungering for more

CHESNUT HILL -- The Red Sox Rookie Development Program is designed to help young players prepare for what playing at the major-league level is like,. That can be valuable for a prospect like Rafael Devers, who hasn’t even made it to Double-A.

But of the eight-man cast at the workout this year, there’s one guy who actually has major-league experience.

Robby Scott joined the Red Sox as a September call-up last season and turned some heads, holding opponents scoreless over six innings of work.

Now the lefty is back working with younger guys to prepare himself for spring training -- something he’s itching to get started.

“It’s one thing that we always talk about,” the left-handed reliever told CSNNE.com “It’s a tough road to get there, but it’s an even tougher and harder road to stay there. And having that taste in September last year was incredible to be a part of it.”

That taste Scott had last fall has only made the desire to rejoin Boston greater.

“Yeah, because now you know what it’s like,” Scott said CSNNE.com. “You see it and you’re there and you’re a part of it. And it’s like, ‘Man, I wanna be there.’ You’re a little bit more hungry.”

And his hunger to pitch with the Red Sox only becomes greater at an event like this where he’s the only one with MLB time.

“They ask on a consistent basis,” Scott started, “ ‘What’s it like?’ ‘What was it like getting there the first day?’ ‘How did the guys react?’ ‘What was it like dealing with the media?’

“That’s what this program is here for, just to kind of gives these guys a little taste of what it is like and get familiar with the circumstances.

While the experience and constant discussion invites players to try to do more in the offseason or change their routine, the 27-year-old has stayed the course, trusting what’s gotten him there.

“The offseason training stays the same, nothing really changes on that side of things,” Scott said. “Nothing changes. Go about my business the way I have the last six, seven years.”

Thursday, Jan. 19: Torts doesn't think LeBron could play hockey

Thursday, Jan. 19: Torts doesn't think LeBron could play hockey

Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading while wondering if the Bruins are ever going to poop, or get off the pot.
 
*John Tortorella wants everybody to know that he thinks there isn’t a chance that Lebron James could play hockey.
 
*In the interest of self-promotion, here’s my radio hit with Toucher and Rich this morning about whether or not Claude Julien should be fired after back-to-back bad losses against the Islanders and Red Wings.
 
*How did Shane Doan arrive at an unhappy place with the Arizona Coyotes where he now is open to moving elsewhere ahead of the trade deadline?
 
*Henrik Lundqvist’s season is entering a crisis level based on what he’s done, and the diminished performance level he’s showing as a more mature goaltender.
 
*A nice piece with a Canadian hockey hero, Hayley Wickenheiser, who recounts some of the legendary moments of her career through a series of pictures.
 
*I totally respect the work that Travis Yost does, but stating the Bruins should stick with Claude Julien because their shooting percentage is bound to turn around isn’t good enough grounds to keep a floundering situation intact, in my opinion. You need to check where the shots are coming from and how many of those shot attempts are completely missing the net to get a better grasp on some of the reasons behind Boston’s dreadful 10-year low shooting percentage. That would also explain some of the reason why Julien needs to be replaced coaching a team that’s largely content on perimeter shots to do it for them while also only sporadically showing the effort required from a middle class talent type of team.

*The Lightning are struggling at Joe Namath levels right now without Steve Stamkos in their lineup, and they need that to change.
 
*For something completely different: congrats to the Boston boys in New Edition for a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.