Patriots changing secondary tough on Bills game plan

934691.jpg

Patriots changing secondary tough on Bills game plan

FOXBORO -- To some people in New England, the moving parts in the Patriots secondary doesn't exactly make them feel as though everything back there is going to be just fine.

But preparing for all the different pieces in the Patriots secondary can be frustrating to opposing coaches. And entering this Sunday's game against the Patriots at Gillette Stadium, Buffalo Bills coach Chan Gailey is having a tough time trying to figure out New England's secondary because of its moving parts.

"The issue with their secondary is they have had so many people beat up," said Gailey in a conference call on Wednesday. "They have struggled to have continuity. You have Devin McCourty playing corner, you have him playing safety, and you have different people in there playing in different spots from time to time.

"The thing that they have been able to do is win and gain a ton of experience with a lot of different people. It is going to improve their secondary overall as time goes on. The moving of people around has created a problem for them as far as making sure everybody is on the same page as far as covering every pass the way I know they would like to, and the way they have done it in the past."

But again, that is also a problem for the Bills, who are trying to game plan for it.

"You do not know who you are going to get where," said Gailey. "You do not know how to read one guy. If you can watch four or five games on a guy, you can sometimes get a read on him. When you do not have that it is very difficult to do."

Edelman says 'there was no maliciousness' to his Steelers comments

patriots-edelman-010117.jpg

Edelman says 'there was no maliciousness' to his Steelers comments

It's funny how during a week like this one, a singularly ridiculous act -- such as Antonio Brown's live stream of the Steelers postgame locker room celebration last weekend -- can lead to a series of brush fires that pop up only to be peed on and put out. 

That was the case yesterday as a comment Julian Edelman made to WEEI earlier this week about Brown's Facebook Live video was spun as a sort of vicious burn directed at the Steelers franchise. 

"That's how that team is run," Edelman said, a comment that read as a more serious indictment than it actually sounded. "I personally don't think that would be something that would happen in our locker room, but hey, whatever. Some people like red and some people like blue. Some people like tulips and some people like roses. Whatever."

That led to Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger being asked about Edelman's comments, and defending the honor of the Rooney family, during a press conference on Wednesday.

"I don’t think I need to speak much," Roethlisberger said. "We’ve got our trophies out there. I’ve got owners that I think are the best in the business. They’re family to us, and I’m sure if he talked to his owner, he would say the same thing about the Rooneys. Anybody in here in the football world or the regular world that owns the Rooneys knows what they stand for. It’s a blessing to call them a family."

And on and on it went. Later in the day, Edelman was asked about his comments during a conference call with Pittsburgh reporters.

So just in case you're keeping score, a Steelers player streamed a video of coach Mike Tomlin calling the Patriots "a-holes," which prompted a response from Edelman. That response prompted a response from Roethlisberger, whose response to the response then led to a response to the response to the response from Edelman.

Got it?

"Yeah, I mean I think it was taken out of context," Edelman said. "I have nothing but respect for the Pittsburgh Steelers. They’re an unbelievable franchise. It starts from the top with the Rooney Family, Coach Tomlin, I think they just mis[interpreted] – I mean, I don’t know, I may have said it, but I think more of that was that it’s not the way we would do it here. That’s just how that goes. There was no maliciousness about it, but it’s whatever. That’s what the media does, try to make stories."