Notre Dame QB pleads not guilty

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Notre Dame QB pleads not guilty

From Comcast SportsNet
SOUTH BEND, Ind. (AP) -- Notre Dame quarterback Tommy Rees pleaded not guilty Thursday to charges stemming from ani ncident in which police used pepper spray to subdue him after an off-campus party. Rees, who turns 20 next week, is charged with one count of battery, two counts of resisting law enforcement and one count of illegal consumption of alcohol by a minor. South Bend police say Rees kneed a police officer in the chest after he ran from the party early May 3 after officers arrived. The court appearance was brief, lasting less than a minute. Rees arrived shortly after 8:20 a.m., sat in the front row for several minutes before his attorney, George Horn, summoned him to appear before Magistrate Brian Steinke without his name being called. Rees didn't speak during his appearance. He met briefly with Horn afterward in a room next to the court and they then left together without speaking to reporters. Rees, who remains free on 250 bond, is due back in court July 17. Linebacker Carlo Calabrese did not appear before Steinke as scheduled Thursday. Assistant prosecutor Andrew White said sometimes defendants e are allowed to have their attorneys appear in their place. He said he didn't know why Calabrese didn't appear. A telephone message seeking comment was left at the office of his attorney, Jeffrey Stesiak, by The Associated Press. White said no plea was entered on Calabrese's behalf. He is scheduled to be in court June 21. Rees, who is from Lake Forest, Ill., is one of four quarterbacks vying for the starters' job next season. He started 12 of 13 games as the Irish went 8-5 last season. Calabrese, who is from Verona, N.J., was a backup linebacker who played in every game last season after starting eight games as a sophomore during the 2010 season Police said they went to the party several blocks from campus on the night classes ended after receiving complaints about a loud party. Police said Rees was among about five people who jumped a backyard fence and ran after officers arrived. Police say an officer pursued Rees, continually telling him to stop, but Rees refused. Police say when Rees ran out into the street, a passing taxi driver maneuvered his car to block Rees' path. Police say when the officer caught up, Rees used his right knee to hit the officer in the chest, knocking the wind out of him. Police say the taxi driver held Rees until the officer caught his breath. Police said Rees continued to struggle even after being knocked down and the officer used pepper spray to help subdue him. Police say Calabrese became upset when he saw Rees was being arrested, ignored warnings to stay out of the street and twice old an officer: "My people will get you." Brian Hardin, Notre Dame's director of football media relations, said football coach Brian Kelly would have no comment on Thursday's court appearance. Kelly previously said he would withhold judgment until he could collect all the facts.

Top prospect Yoan Moncada will join Red Sox on Friday

Top prospect Yoan Moncada will join Red Sox on Friday

BOSTON - The Boston Red Sox have announced they will call up top prospect Yoan Moncada when rosters expand from the current 25-man limit.

Earlier Wednesday, Farrell wouldn't officially confirm the imminent promotion but hinted that the Red Sox appeared ready to call up their top prospect.

Farrell first noted that the Red Sox "need better production'' at third base, where both Travis Shaw and Aaron Hill have struggled mightily at the position.

Moncada, a natural second baseman, was shifted to third base earlier this month at Double A Portland. Moncada has a slash line of .285/.388/.547 with 11 homers and 27 RBI in 44 games.

Asked specifically about the potential of a call-up for Moncada, Farrell said: "We've talked about Yoan. And not just as a pinch-runner. It's an exciting young player, an extremely talented guy. There's all positive reviews and evaluations of him.

"When that major league experience is going to initiate, time will tell that. But in terms of playing the position of third base [in the big leagues], that conversation has been had.''

Previously, the Red Sox had resisted bringing Moncada to the big leagues, worried that he wouldn't be in the lineup often enough to continue his development. The Sox didn't want him to miss out on additional experience in the minors by playing only part-time in the majors.

But now that the minor league seasons are about to end -- Portland finishes Labor Day -- there's nothing in the minors for Moncada to miss.

"This is a different scenario than if it were July or early August,'' said Farrell. "The minor league season ends [soon], so is there benefit to him just being here? The answer to that is yes. Do you weigh playing 'X' number of games per week versus what he could be doing at Portland or Pawtucket? Well, that goes away [with the minor league regular seasons end].

"So, again, by all accounts, there's nothing but positives that could come out of experience here -- if that were to happen.''

 Moncada's promotion is similar to the one experience by Xander Bogaerts in 2013, who was brought up in the final week of August 2013 and remained with the club all the way through the end of the team's World Series run that fall, taking playing time from struggling third baseman Will Middlebrooks.

 "For those who have been around this team for a number of years,'' said Farrell, "teams that have had success have always had an injection of young players late in the season that have helped carry the team through the postseason. I think Yoan would be in a similar category to when Pedey [Dustin Pedroia], when Jake [Jacoby Ellsbury] came into the picture. And Andrew (Benintendi) is already here, so I wouldn't separate [Moncada] out from that at all.

"In fact, he's a direct comparison [to those cases].’’

Farrell agreed that the arrival of a young, highly-touted player can inject some energy into a team in the throes of a pennant race.

"Absolutely, there is,'' said Farrell. "You've got a newness element. You've got, likely, above-average speed. You've got athleticism. You've got the unknown across the field on how does a given [opposing] team attack a given guy.

"In the cases we've talked about, it has been beneficial to us for the young player to come up. They find a way to contribute in a meaningful role. "

Without saying that Moncada's promotion was a definite,  he said "there's a lot [of positives]going for it.''

Farrell also acknowledged that the Sox held internal discussions about how Moncada would be utilized, given that the switch-hitter has been far more productive from the left side of the plate.

"We've talked about what's strong side, how do you look to best ease him in, so to speak,'' said Farrell. "We thought that with Benintendi, how do we best ease him in. Well, he blew the doors off of that one [with his early success]. So, if it happens, and if begins here soon, you'll all be aware.''

Farrell said the reports of Moncada's transition to third base have been encouraging despite three errors in his first nine games there.

"He's shown good range, an above-average arm,'' said Farrell. "Where there will be ongoing work and continued development, just as there was at second base, is the ball hit straight at him. That's just pure technique and fundamental positioning with hands and feet.

"But as far as range to his glove side, moving to third base, that seemingly has not been that big of a challenge for him.''