N. Korea banned from World Cup for bizarre reason

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N. Korea banned from World Cup for bizarre reason

From Comcast SportsNet Thursday, August 25, 2011
ZURICH (AP) FIFA banned North Korea from the 2015 Womens World Cup afterfive players tested positive for steroids from traditional musk deer glandtherapy at the tournament last month.FIFA on Thursday imposed bans of up to 18 months on all five players, whoNorth Korean officials said were treated with traditional therapy after beingstruck by lightning at a pre-tournament training camp. Jong Pok Sim, Hong Myong Hui, Ho Un Byol and Ri Un Hyang were suspended fromall soccer-related activity for 18 months, while Song Jong Sun was ineligiblefor 14 months, FIFA said.North Koreas soccer federation was fined 400,000, and team doctor Nam JongAe was banned for six years.The fine exactly corresponds to the prize money the association would havereceived for their 13th place in the final ranking of the Womens World Cup inGermany, FIFA said.Defenders Song and Jong failed drugs tests before the World Cup game againstColombia. FIFA then tested the entire North Korean team after its final match.FIFAs disciplinary panel also banned Colombia backup goalkeeper YinethVaron for two years for doping at the tournament.The doping case was the most serious at a major FIFA tournament in 17 years.In July, FIFAs chief medical officer Jiri Dvorak said after extensivetesting, we can really say with far-reaching confidence that these steroidswere the result of this so-callled Chinese traditional medicine.

Quotes, notes and stars: Ramirez knows error 'can't happen'

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Quotes, notes and stars: Ramirez knows error 'can't happen'

Quotes, notes and stars from the Red Sox' 2-1 loss to the Los Angeles Angels ofAnaheim

Quotes:

"I tried to get two (outs) before I got one. That can't happen." - Hanley Ramirez on his throwing error which cost the Red Sox the game.

"Executing pitches - that's the name of the game." - David Price on improvement he showed from his last start.

"Fourth time through the order, middle of the lineup. . . Price had done his job. In a one-run game, we felt it was best to start a clean inning with a reliever." - John Farrell after lifting David Price after eight innings and 108 pitches.

Notes:

* Reliever Brad Ziegler was charged with the loss for the second straight game.

* Each of the last seven Red Sox losses has been by one or two runs.

* Dustin Pedroia has reached base in 31 consecutive games.

* The Red Sox four-game losing streak is their longest of the season.

* The Sox are now 9-23 in their last 32 meetings with the Angels.

* David Price did not allow a run for the second time this season.

Stars:

1) David Price

After a stretch of shaky outings, Price did his job with eight scoreless innings, getting 14 outs on groundouts while walking just one.

2) Jered Weaver

At times, the radar gun made Weaver's pitches look like softball offerings. But mixing junk, he held the Sox to a single run over 5 1/3 innings

3) Mookie Betts

He had just one hit - single in the eighth - but his sacrifice fly in the third produced the only run of the night.

First impressions: Ziegler can't finish Price's strong start

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First impressions: Ziegler can't finish Price's strong start

First impressions from the Red Sox' 2-1 loss to the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim

1) David Price pitched in the truest sense

Price wasn't necessarily overpowering with only six strikeouts in eight innings, but he succeeded in keeping the ball down in the zone, resulting in a ton of groundouts.

In eight innings, the Angels produced just two flouts to the outfield, both of them routine.

Otherwise, Price deftly mixed his changeup, slider and two-seamer to produce ground balls. His location was more precise and he induced weak contact in at-bat after at-bat.

 

2) The danger of a closer like Brad Ziegler was on display

The throwing error by Hanley Ramirez resulted in two runs scoring but Ziegler allowed three base hits to set the stage.

Ziegler doesn't get a lot of swing-and-miss with his sinker; what he gets is a lot of balls put in play. When things are going well, that results in groundouts; when they're not, it means baserunners and strange things happening.

As inconsistent as Craig Kimbrel has been in some non-save situations, he at least has the ability to record strikeouts and keep balls out of play.  That's not the case with Zieger, as the Red Sox learned the hard way in Anaheim Thursday night.

3) The Red Sox wisely took advantage of Jered Weaver on the bases

Weaver's high leg kick and reliance on off-speed pitches make for a slow delivery time to the plate. Dustin Pedroia would have easily stole second in the first but made the mistake of going into his slide too far ahead of the bag, and though initially ruled safe, was deemed out after a replay challenge.

In the sixth, Xander Bogaerts, was more successful in his stolen base. Neither steal led to a run, but the Sox did put some additional pressure on Weaver