McDaniels lauds Brady's pocket awareness

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McDaniels lauds Brady's pocket awareness

Early Monday, Tom Brady said he spent his bye week thinking about football. Weirdo.

Of course, that's what makes him brilliant. So good, in fact, that even when he rolls up a first half in which he throws 16 touchdowns and three picks and is on pace for a 5,000-yard passing season, there's rumbles of slippage.

On Monday, I asked offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels for an appraisal of Brady's work in 2012.

"I think that the quarterback in general, and Tom specifically, is really evaluated on his decision making, his accuracy and his ability to take care of the football and then ultimately get our offense into the end zone," McDaniels began. "There are certainly things that he can do better than what weve done in the first portion of the season. I know hell work hard at trying to maximize his performance going forward."

Brady's ability to manage the game from the pocket and be aware of pressure has always been seen as a strength. There's rarely been cause to question his stomach for standing in against pressure. But he has, in 2012, occasionally shown happy feet. And his willingness to get rid of the ball and fight another play has been seen in some circles as a sign he's an aging quarterback concerned about contact.

It's really nothing different than anything he put out there earlier in his career -- he generally subscribes to "discretion is the better part of valor" when a play is going South. He undeniably avoids contact, whether running with the ball and hitting the deck fast, going down quickly in the face of a rush he cannot beat or getting involved in tackling on an interception return.

But McDaniels says Brady's awareness continues to be exemplary.

"I think his pocket awareness and the things he does in the pocket have always been strengths of his," said the offensive coordinator. "I think he does a great job of understanding the quarterback position. There is always kind of an invisible clock in your head and you know based on the scheme or the protection how many blockers were keeping in, how many receivers were sending out and that may change or alter how much time you have to deliver the football.

"I think hes very aware of those different dynamics that can happen on each pass play," McDaniels added. "He does, generally, a really good job of distributing the ball where it needs to be distributed and also understanding on certain plays there is a time and a place to hold it and there is a time and a place to take the check down or throw the ball underneath or even throw the ball away and move onto the next play and try to get the first down some other way. Hes somebody who obviously understands our passing game and his ability to operate within that system and do the right thing is certainly a big thing for us and will be going forward."

As each season enters crunch time, Brady often shows a little more doggedness in the pocket. Witness some of the punishment he stood in to accept in the last two Super Bowls. The clock in Brady's head moves a little slower when the games get a little bigger.

Roethlisberger takes aim at young Steelers teammates after loss to Patriots

Roethlisberger takes aim at young Steelers teammates after loss to Patriots

FOXBORO – Ben Roethlisberger rolled some teammates under the bus Sunday night but it was hard to tell exactly which ones had the tire tracks to prove it.

“It just at times almost felt like it was almost too big for some of the young guys,” said Roethlisberger after the Steelers were sent home sucking on a 36-17 loss.

PATRIOTS 36, STEELERS 17

He could have been talking about young receivers Sammie Coates and Cobi Hamilton, each of whom had deep balls slide through or past their hands.

Or he could have been talking about Antonio Brown, who within a week, went from being the star of his own Facebook Live broadcast to being bottled up by the Patriots secondary (seven catches, 77 yards).

While Coates and Hamilton didn’t come up with “combat catches,” a Steelers term that both Roethlisberger and head coach Mike Tomlin employed, Brown launched the Steelers week of preparation by depantsing Tomlin and the rest of the Steelers veterans with his tone deaf self-promotion.  

Roethlisberger may have been talking about the on-field product when he said the following, but it just as easily could be applied to Brown.

“Hopefully this is a learning game for guys to understand that this isn’t promised to anybody,” said Roethlisberger. “Tomorrow’s not promised to any of us and just to make the playoffs isn’t enough to get to this championship game. A lot of guys have been in this league for a long time and haven’t been to any of these or have been to very few, so I hope that they understand the importance and relish the opportunity if it comes again.”

Asked if he thinks the younger players understood that, Roethlisberger said, “I don’t know. That’s a good question. That’s probably a question for other guys, but I know I did.”

Brady on Hogan after record-setting night: 'He's been incredible'

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Brady on Hogan after record-setting night: 'He's been incredible'

FOXBORO -- Someone told Chris Hogan before the AFC Championship that it would be a game he'd look back on 30 years from now and remember in perfect detail. 

That may be difficult for him given the sheer volume of plays he made in Sunday's 36-17 win over the Steelers. Hogan finished the game with nine catches for 180 yards and two touchdowns on 12 targets, surpassing Deion Branch for the franchise record for receiving yards in a postseason game. 

"It'll be something that definitely I'll remember for the rest of my career," he said, "and probably for the rest of my life . . . I'm happy for everyone in this locker room, all these guys in the locker room, the coaches. We've worked so hard to get here, and I was just happy that I was able to help this team get a win tonight."

Hogan did more than that. He was pivotal during New England's first touchdown drive of the night, catching passes on three consecutive plays for a total of 41 yards, and then reeling in an easy 16-yard touchdown when the Steelers defense lost track of him in the right half of the end zone. 

"I moved a little bit to the left because they were pressuring up the middle, and the pocket kind of collapsed," Brady said. "So I kind of slid to the left and I had good vision. They kind of bit down on Julian [Edelman] pretty hard, and then Hogs just was standing there in the back of the end zone."

Hogan's other catches were generally more contested than that one, but several were made without a Steelers defender harrassing him. And when they let him be, he made them pay. 

The flea-flicker pass that resulted in Hogan's second score of the day was a kick in the gut for the Steelers defense, putting the Patriots ahead, 17-6. Brady initially needed a reminder of how Hogan scored his second touchdown of the night, saying, "Oh, the flea-flicker. How could I forget that?"

"We ran one earlier in the year against, I think it was Baltimore, and it worked," Brady added. "I hit Hogan on that one too, on a crossing route. Those were well-executed plays. It's nice when you can take advantage of some of those plays, nice to gain some chunks that way when you kind of get some misdirection or double-pass, flea-flicker, something like that. It's a big spark for the team."

At that point Hogan already had racked up a career day. He had never scored multiple touchdowns in an NFL game coming in, and he set his own career-high for receiving in the postseason with 117 yards. In his first and only playoff game the week before, he had 95 yards on four catches. 

Hogan suffered a thigh injury in that game that limited him in practice and made him questionable against the Steelers. But he played, and he gave his team an early boost, helping force the Steelers to play catch-up for the vast majority of the night.

And the injury didn't appear to slow him down all that much. Though there were times when he was slow to get to his feet after being tackled, he showed the kind of speed that allowed him to put himself near the top of the list in the NFL when it comes to yards-per-catch (18.7). Among  receivers with at least 20 catches, he trailed only Sammie Coates (20.7) of the Steelers. 

"He's been incredible," Brady said. "I mean, to lead the league in average yards per catch is spectacular. He's made big plays for us all season. He made big plays in the biggest game of the year for us."

It's one that he'll remember for a long time, but he's hoping to add to that happy memory in two weeks.

"We've grinded throughout this entire year, this is what we worked for, and this is what we wanted to get to," Hogan said. "It's a special moment for all of these guys in this locker room. We'll enjoy this and get back to work because we've got one more."