May 5, 2011: Angels 11, Red Sox 0

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May 5, 2011: Angels 11, Red Sox 0

By Sean McAdam
CSNNE.com

BOSTON -- On a day in which the Red Sox needed John Lackey to provide both quality and quantity, the Red Sox right-hander could offer neither.

Short on pitching after Wednesday's marathon loss, during which they used eight hurlders, the Sox got just four-plus innings from Lackey, who gave up eight runs in a one-sided beating by the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, 11-0.

Lackey had beaten his former team in each of the previous four times he had faced them before Thursday, but was overmatched on this occasion, allowing 10 hits, including five straight in the fourth inning. When he gave up a two-run homer to Mark Trumbo before getting a single hitter out in the fifth, he was done for the day, with his ERA soaring to 7.16.

After losing the first six head-to-head meetings with the Red Sox this season, the Angels won the final two in a row.

Meanwhile, Red Sox had just seven hits and suffered their fourth shutout in 31 games. The 11-run deficit matches the worst for the Sox this season, who also lost 16-5 to Tampa Bay on April 11.

Scott Atchison and Rich Hill, brought up for Pawtucket before the game to replace the injured Bobby Jenks and Dan Wheeler, took care of the final five innings.

Player of the Game: Joel Pineiro

Like the Red Sox, the Angels were hurting for pitching manpower after the 13-inning marathon Wednesday nightThursday morning. Unlike the Red Sox, the Angels had a starter do something about it.

Joel Pineiro offered 5 23 innings of shutout baseball, allowing the Red Sox just three hits, two of them singles.

Pineiro struggled with his command at times, walking four and was hardly overpowering with just two strikeouts. But he got the Angels into the sixth with a healthy lead.

Honorable Mention: Erik Aybar

Aybar was a pain in the Red Sox' side all series and Thursday was no different as he had a four-hit afternoon, scored twice and knocked in a run while stealing two bases and setting the tone from the top of the Los Angeles lineup.

The Goat: John Lackey

Lackey took a 4-0 career record into his start against his former teammates but they teed off on him almost from the start, knocking him around for 10 hits and eight runs over four-plusinnings.

Turning Point: Bourjos sparks rally

The Angels were leading 3-0 in the fourth when Lackey got two outs. But Peter Bourjos, the No. 9 hitter, singled to keep the inning going and four more Angels followed with base hits of their own. The rout was on, with the Angels leading 6-0 before Lackey could get the elusive third out.

By the Numbers: 6

In six starts this season, Lackey has given up six or more earned runs in three -- or half -- of his starts.

Quote of Note:

"I definitely sensed that there was a need for me to pitch well to get some momentum going. If I had pitched better early on, I think the guys would have found a little more energy. My (inability) to pitch well definitely hurt that morale.'' -- John Lackey

Sean McAdam can be reached at smcadam@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Sean on Twitter at http:twitter.comsean_mcadam.

Friday, Dec. 2: Toews vs. Matthews

Friday, Dec. 2: Toews vs. Matthews

Here are all the links from around the hockey world and what I’m reading, while everybody in New England is in mourning over the latest Gronk booboo. 

*A pretty neat sharpshooting video with Jonathan Toews and that young whippersnapper Auston Matthews squaring off against each other. 

*Craig Custance looks a little deeper into the situation with the Florida Panthers and how things are stabilizing after the rough firing of Gerard Gallant last week. 

*Now. let’s get to the real important stuff: the San Jose Sharks website has put together their Movember rankings for the player’s mustaches. 

*FOH (Friend of Haggs) Bruce Garrioch says that the plans for an outdoor game in Ottawa are again back on the NHL’s agenda. 

*Erik Erlendsson has put together a “Lightning Insider” website where you can find all the latest news about the Tampa Bay franchise. Check it out. 

*As guys such as Anton Khudobin prove when they’re thrust into the starting spot, backup goalies matter in today’s NHL. 

*For something completely different: a mash-up of Kylo Ren and “Girls” from the mad mind of Adam Driver is exactly just that. 

 

Chara ‘feels better’ as he closes in on return, but won’t play in Buffalo

Chara ‘feels better’ as he closes in on return, but won’t play in Buffalo

BRIGHTON, Mass. – Zdeno Chara said he is “feeling better” after going through a full practice with the Bruins, but the captain won’t be making the one game road trip to Buffalo for Saturday afternoon’s matinee game vs. the Sabres. 

Chara was going through line rushes and battle drills with the rest of his teammates while practicing for the second day in a row, but made it clear that his lower body injury hasn’t been cleared for game action yet. 

“It’s day-to-day. It feels better…yeah. But it’s still day-to-day,” said a rather laconic Chara when it came to questions about his injury. “It would feel much better [to play] than it feels [not playing].”

Claude Julien said his 39-year-old defenseman has moved into true “day-to-day” status as he nears a return after missing what will be his sixth game in a row on Saturday afternoon, but that he isn’t quite ready to go just yet.

“[Chara] and [Noel] Acciari won’t be on the trip,” said Julien. “I think [Chara] is getting pretty close. When you see him at practice things are going pretty well for him. I think that the term day-to-day is fitting for him right now. A lot of times when we say day-to-day we don’t know whether it’s going to be two days, three days or even a week. But in his case I would say that day-to-day is really day-to-day now with him.” 

One thing the Bruins can be heartened by is that they’ve managed to survive without Chara: the B’s have gone 2-2-1 and allowed just nine goals in the five games since their No. 1 defenseman went down. They have been able to continue collecting points in sometimes ugly, workmanlike fashion. 

That gives the Bruins the luxury of not rushing their D-man along before he’s ready and gives some of their other defensemen added confidence that they can effectively do the job with or without their 6-foot-9 stopper.