Lucic missing from practice; fan stricken at Wilmington

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Lucic missing from practice; fan stricken at Wilmington

WILMINGTON The line combinations are a little different today with Bruins power forward Milan Lucic absent from practice at Ristuccia Arena this morning. Instead, free-agent camp invite Jay Pandolfo is wearing a white practice jersey and skating on the top line at left wing with David Krejci and Nathan Horton.

Pandolfo had been in a line with rookies Ryan Spooner, Lane MacDermid and Jamie Tardif throughout training camp, and perhaps gets to show his worth stepping in as a veteran extra forward when called upon due to injuries or personal reasons.

Lucics wife was expecting their first child this month, so that may be the reason behind his absence. Gregory Campbell had taken Lucics place camped in front of the net on the first unit power play drills as Nathan Horton covered the slot area, Tyler Seguin worked the half-wall and Zdeno Chara and David Krejci manned the points.

A fan was also treated medically and taken off via ambulance at the very start of practice, and it appeared they were administering CPR on the fan in the stands. Bruins players stopped practice while the fan was treated and then left the ice temporarily while the practice observer was taken off on a stretcher. Best wishes to that person, as it was a truly scary situation when a crowd of fans and medical personnel gathered round them to administer emergency treatment.

The rest of the lines and defensemen pairings are the same as theyve been at practice:

Pandolfo-Krejci-Horton
Marchand-Bergeron-Seguin
Bourque-Kelly-Peverley
Paille-Campbell-Thornton
MacDermid-Spooner-Tardif

Chara-Boychuk
Seidenberg-Hamilton
Ference-McQuaid
Bartkowski-Warsofsky

Rask
Khudobin

Extended podcast with David Ortiz on his career, PED's, the Marathon bombing and more

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Extended podcast with David Ortiz on his career, PED's, the Marathon bombing and more

David Ortiz offers thoughtful answers and insight in this interview with Sean McAdam touching on his beginning with the Red Sox, the Boston Marathon bombings, showing up on a PED list, his impact in the dugout, and more.

You can also see pieces of the interview on CSN Friday at 6:30pm on a special Arbella Early Edition with Gary Tanguay and Lou Merloni.

RELATED Special Video Series - "Big Papi - An Oral History" from CSN

Thomas excited for reunion with Green

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Thomas excited for reunion with Green

WALTHAM, Mass. -- When the phone rang this summer, Boston Celtics guard Isaiah Thomas had to do a double-take when he saw the name on the caller ID.

It was Gerald Green, his ex-teammate in Phoenix.

Although they only shared a locker room for 45 games in Phoenix, the two became quick friends.

On the court they developed instant chemistry while coming off the Suns bench. And that bond spilled off the court as Green would later spend time with Thomas in the Seattle-Tacoma, Wash. area in the summer months.

They were cool with each other, cool enough to where Thomas knew it wasn’t in Green’s nature to pick up the phone and call just to say hi.

“Gerald doesn’t call anybody,” Thomas said. “When he called I knew something was up.”

Green said Boston, the team that drafted him in 2006 straight out of high school, was interested in bringing him back for a second stint with the club.

“I tried to put my two cents in and he got here,” Thomas said.

There were several factors that led Green back to Boston, with a chance to reunite with Thomas being high on that list.

Green, already in Phoenix at the time the Suns signed Thomas in 2014, was impressed with the way the 5-9 guard carried himself.

“He was a genuine guy, came in really humble,” Green said. “I saw the talent was there. I knew he had the potential to be one of the best point guards in this league.”

Thomas certainly made a case for such lofty praise with how he performed last season, good enough to earn his first all-star selection.

What really stuck out to Green was that Thomas’ mentality and approach to the game was almost a carbon copy of his own.

“When we stepped on the court we had the same mentality,” Green said. “By any means necessary, get a bucket and play harder than the next team; just try and push the first team, make the first team better every day.”

Thomas was coming off the bench, showing lots of potential and promise that he could carry a heavier load if given an opportunity to do so.

He averaged 15.2 points, 3.7 assists and 2.4 rebounds in 25.7 minutes off the Suns bench in 46 games. Even more significant was that when Thomas did play for the Suns, they were 26-20.

In the games without him, they were just 13-23.

Green was admittedly disappointed they traded away Thomas, believing that season would have had a very different outcome had they not sent him to Boston.

And just like Green recognized Thomas’ skills and how much his team could have benefited from keeping him around, Thomas speaks in glowing terms about Green and what his return to Boston means for the team.

“We needed someone like him; a guy that could shoot the ball, a guy that could space the floor; instant scorer whether he starts or comes off the bench,” Thomas said. “Where the he starts or come off the bench. He’s going to really help us.”