... but lose a key player to a broken hand

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... but lose a key player to a broken hand

From Comcast SportsNet
MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) -- Clippers forward Caron Butler broke his left hand Sunday in Game 1 of Los Angeles' series against the Memphis Grizzlies. Butler had 12 points and two rebounds in 23 minutes, and the Clippers rallied without him. They tied the NBA playoff record for largest deficit overcome at the end of three quarters, when they trailed by 21, and beat the Grizzlies 99-98. The forward said he thinks he got hurt early in the third quarter when his hand got caught during a pin-down screen in the jersey of Grizzlies forward Rudy Gay, another former Connecticut star. He was able to keep playing but once he went to the bench, he noticed his hand throbbing. He went to the locker room for an X-ray and returned to the bench. "I was about to go back in the game, and got the X-ray results," Butler said. "I told Coach I was ready, and he was about to throw me back in the fire." The veteran forward is one of the few Clippers with playoff experience, though he was injured last year when he was with the NBA champion Dallas Mavericks. A starter, Butler averaged 12 points for the Clippers this season. "I feel terrible for him," Clippers coach Vinny Del Negro said. "He's been such a pro for us, but injuries are part of it. Other guys are going to have to step up like they did tonight. But replacing Caron right now ... he's been so valuable for us all year. I know the guys feel bad." Gay was told about Butler's injury after the game. "People are going to step up, and we're not expecting anything to be easy with Caron or without Caron," Gay said. "We're going to have to go out and play hard."

First impressions: Owens improves, Scott scuffles

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First impressions: Owens improves, Scott scuffles

NEW YORK -- First impression from Red Sox' 5-1 loss to the Yankees:

* Henry Owens looked improved over earlier starts.

The lefty took the place of Drew Pomeranz Thursday night and pitched into the fifth inning, allowing two runs on four hits.

Talent evaluators believe that Owens has the stuff necessary to be a back-end starter in the big leagues if -- and that's a big qualifier -- he can command his pitches.

Alas, that's often been an issue for Owens, who averaged 3.4 walks per nine innings last season in Boston and, in four starts earlier this season, a bloated 9.3 walks per nine innings.

On Thursday night, Owens showed far better control, issuing just two walks. Further, he managed to pitch ahead in the count, giving him an advantage against the New York lineup. And mixing his changeup and fastball, he fanned six.

* Robby Scott had a bad night at a bad time.

Scott's in the mix to make the Red Sox post-season roster as a lefty specialist, competing against the likes of Fernando Abad.

He had been effective in most of his previous outings, with no runs allowed in six appearances with five strikeouts and a walk.

But brought in to face Brian McCann with runners on first and second and one out in the sixth, he yielded a single to center.

After getting Aaron Hicks on a flyout, he walked rookie Tyler Austin to force in a run, then heaved a wild pitch that scored another run before retiring Brett Gardner on a flyout.

Keeping in mind that Scott wouldn't be asked to face that many righthanders were he to make the post-season roster, Thursday's outing wasn't helpful in making his case.

* Yoan Moncada is gone for now.

The Red Sox announced that the rookie third baseman had traveled to Fort Myers to prepare for his upcoming assignment in the Arizona Fall League next month.

Expectations were high for Moncada when he joined the Red Sox on Labor Day weekend in Oakland and when he collected multiple hits in each of his first two starts, it appeared as though he would get most of the playing time at third for the remainder of the season.

But not long after, Moncada began chasing breaking balls out of the strike zone and looking very much overmatched at the plate. HE struck out in nine consecutive at-bats.

That doesn't mean that Moncada won't someday -- likely in the not-too-distant future -- be a very good major league player. But it is a reminder of how big a jump it is to go from Double A.

And, it served to point out how remarkable Andrew Benintendi has been in making that same jump.