Lackey, Red Sox routed by Angels, 11-0


Lackey, Red Sox routed by Angels, 11-0

By Sean McAdam

BOSTON -- On a day in which the Red Sox needed John Lackey to provide both quality and quantity, the Red Sox right-hander could offer neither.

Short on pitching after Wednesday's marathon loss, during which they used eight hurlders, the Sox got just four-plus innings from Lackey, who gave up eight runs in a one-sided beating by the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, 11-0.

Lackey had beaten his former team in each of the previous four times he had faced them before Thursday, but was overmatched on this occasion, allowing 10 hits, including five straight in the fourth inning. When he gave up a two-run homer to Mark Trumbo before getting a single hitter out in the fifth, he was done for the day, with his ERA soaring to 7.16.

After losing the first six head-to-head meetings with the Red Sox this season, the Angels won the final two in a row.

Meanwhile, Red Sox had just seven hits and suffered their fourth shutout in 31 games. The 11-run deficit matches the worst for the Sox this season, who also lost 16-5 to Tampa Bay on April 11.

Scott Atchison and Rich Hill, brought up for Pawtucket before the game to replace the injured Bobby Jenks and Dan Wheeler, took care of the final five innings.

STAR OF THE GAME: Joel Pinerio
Like the Red Sox, the Angels were hurting for pitching manpower after the 13-inning marathon Wednesday nightThursday morning. Unlike the Red Sox, the Angels had a starter do something about it.

Joel Pineiro offered 5 23 innings of shutout baseball, allowing the Red Sox just three hits, two of them singles.

Pineiro struggled with his command at times, walking four and was hardly overpowering with just two strikeouts. But he got the Angels into the sixth with a healthy lead.

Aybar was a pain in the Red Sox' side all series and Thursday was no different as he had a four-hit afternoon, scored twice and knocked in a run while stealing two bases and setting the tone from the top of the Los Angeles lineup.

Lackey took a 4-0 career record into his start against his former teammates but they teed off on him almost from the start, knocking him around for 10 hits and eight runs over four-plusinnings.

The Angels were leading 3-0 in the fourth when Lackey got two outs. But Peter Bourjos, the No. 9 hitter, singled to keep the inning going and four more Angels followed with base hits of their own. The rout was on, with the Angels leading 6-0 before Lackey could get the elusive third out.

In six starts this season, Lackey has given up six or more eanred runs in three -- or half -- of his starts.

"I definitely sensed that there was a need for me to pitch well to get some momentum going. If I had pitched better early on, I think the guys would have found a little more energy. My (inability) to pitch well definitely hurt that morale.'' -- John Lackey

Sean McAdam can be reached at Follow Sean on Twitter at http:twitter.comsean_mcadam

Bruins need to "find a way to start playing with a lead"

Bruins need to "find a way to start playing with a lead"

BOSTON -- There’s only so long that a team can hope to thrive, or even survive, in the NHL if they’re constantly chasing the game on the scoreboard, and chasing the puck after digging themselves a hole. The Bruins have been that team in the first couple of weeks during the regular season, and made it five times in five games that they’ve given up the game’s first goal in an eventual 4-2 loss to the Montreal Canadiens at TD Garden.

It’s a pattern that is long past getting old to Bruins head coach Claude Julien, who can’t seem to play the front-runner this season despite three comebacks that have allowed for a 3-2-0 record overall this season.

“I hope it’s not a habit. It’s certainly not what we’re looking for, but there’s no doubt. I think it’s pretty obvious that with the amount of games we’ve played, five games, we haven’t scored first,” said Julien. “We talked about that this morning, trying to get that first goal, and it hasn’t happened yet.”

The start to the game wasn’t really the problem on Saturday night as it’s been a couple of times this season. Instead the Bruins enjoyed a handful of quality scoring chances in the opening 20 minutes against the Habs, but couldn’t come through and finish off those plays when it might have meant an early lead.

Instead it lead to what Julien termed a “terrible” second period that was flat, full of mistakes and ended with the B’s trailing Montreal by a couple of goals. The Bruins scratched and clawed their way to making it a one-goal game in the third period, but that was as close as the Black and Gold would get in losing their ninth straight home game to the arch-rival Canadiens.

“It’s kind of been a story about how things are going for us this far, we’ve got to find a way to start playing with a lead. If you don’t capitalize on your chances, you see what happens when you come out [flat] in the second period,” said Torey Krug, who finished a game-worst minus-3 in the loss for the Bruins. “We had another poor second period and you know it’s kind of… you got to make sure that we put our hand on that and it doesn’t become a thing for the team this year. You see that when you don’t capitalize on chances early, that’s what’s going to happen.”

It’s been a positive development that the Bruins have shown the willingness and backbone to fight back into games after early deficits, and they showed that quality once again on Saturday night by scoring a couple of goals in the third period to keep things close. But the Bruins would be best served if they can start lighting the lamp a little earlier in these games, and see how the other half lives by playing with a comfortable lead every once in a while.