Joseph embracing trip to D-League

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Joseph embracing trip to D-League

BOSTON When Kris Joseph got the news that the Boston Celtics were sending him to the D-League, he could not have been any happier.

While he has enjoyed his time with the Boston Celtics, he knew that there was little to no chance that he would play soon.

And so the idea of being in the D-League will allow him to do exactly what the league's about - developing his game.

Joseph's first D-League action with the Maine Red Claws came in Friday night's 123-115 win at Canton.

The 6-foot-7 rookie had a game-high 28 points and eight rebounds in rallying the Red Claws (1-0) from a double-digit deficit. Boston's first-round pick Fab Melo had two points and a game-high four blocked shots.

Being a first-round pick, Melo's status is a bit more secure than that of Joseph who was selected by the C's in the second round of last June's NBA draft.

So for him, many of the players that he will face in the D-League are in a lot of ways similar to him in that they too are fighting to prove they are indeed worthy of being in the NBA.

Performances like the one he put on Friday serve as just another example of the promise that the C's see in him.

And for Joseph, the transition from the NBA to the D-League so far has been relatively smooth.

"For one, they're running a lot of the same plays if not all the same plays that we ran up (in Boston)," Joseph told CSNNE.com. "So I was already ahead of everybody. That helped me a lot, knowing the plays and knowing my spots. Me playing with these guys and knowing what level of intensity you have to play with helped me down there, too."

To see him get off to an impressive start with the Red Claws isn't all that surprising.

While with the Celtics, Joseph was often the first to arrive on game day. He would spend time with assistant coaches working on shot, doing various ball-handling drills along with an assortment of other game-related tasks.

It was one of those things that did not go unnoticed by his teammates.

"That's it right there," C's veteran Brandon Bass told CSNNE.com recently. "That's what it takes to be in this league; you have to keep working on your game, trying to get better. He's young, but he gets it. That's good for him; good for us, too."

But there's only so much growth and development that can come about by getting shots up prior to games and after practice.

Eventually, those skills have to manifest themselves in real games which is why the D-League is so important to Joseph.

"They (Celtics) don't want me to just be sitting around," Joseph said. "Me, neither. I want to play; that's how you really get better. I know playing behind Paul Pierce and Jeff Green, there's just not going to be much of an opportunity for me to play right now. That doesn't mean I can't get any better. That's what the D-League is for me; a chance to keep working on my game, keep improving so that when that opportunity does come, I'll be ready."

Quotes, notes and stars: Ramirez knows error 'can't happen'

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Quotes, notes and stars: Ramirez knows error 'can't happen'

Quotes, notes and stars from the Red Sox' 2-1 loss to the Los Angeles Angels ofAnaheim

Quotes:

"I tried to get two (outs) before I got one. That can't happen." - Hanley Ramirez on his throwing error which cost the Red Sox the game.

"Executing pitches - that's the name of the game." - David Price on improvement he showed from his last start.

"Fourth time through the order, middle of the lineup. . . Price had done his job. In a one-run game, we felt it was best to start a clean inning with a reliever." - John Farrell after lifting David Price after eight innings and 108 pitches.

Notes:

* Reliever Brad Ziegler was charged with the loss for the second straight game.

* Each of the last seven Red Sox losses has been by one or two runs.

* Dustin Pedroia has reached base in 31 consecutive games.

* The Red Sox four-game losing streak is their longest of the season.

* The Sox are now 9-23 in their last 32 meetings with the Angels.

* David Price did not allow a run for the second time this season.

Stars:

1) David Price

After a stretch of shaky outings, Price did his job with eight scoreless innings, getting 14 outs on groundouts while walking just one.

2) Jered Weaver

At times, the radar gun made Weaver's pitches look like softball offerings. But mixing junk, he held the Sox to a single run over 5 1/3 innings

3) Mookie Betts

He had just one hit - single in the eighth - but his sacrifice fly in the third produced the only run of the night.

First impressions: Ziegler can't finish Price's strong start

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First impressions: Ziegler can't finish Price's strong start

First impressions from the Red Sox' 2-1 loss to the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim

1) David Price pitched in the truest sense

Price wasn't necessarily overpowering with only six strikeouts in eight innings, but he succeeded in keeping the ball down in the zone, resulting in a ton of groundouts.

In eight innings, the Angels produced just two flouts to the outfield, both of them routine.

Otherwise, Price deftly mixed his changeup, slider and two-seamer to produce ground balls. His location was more precise and he induced weak contact in at-bat after at-bat.

 

2) The danger of a closer like Brad Ziegler was on display

The throwing error by Hanley Ramirez resulted in two runs scoring but Ziegler allowed three base hits to set the stage.

Ziegler doesn't get a lot of swing-and-miss with his sinker; what he gets is a lot of balls put in play. When things are going well, that results in groundouts; when they're not, it means baserunners and strange things happening.

As inconsistent as Craig Kimbrel has been in some non-save situations, he at least has the ability to record strikeouts and keep balls out of play.  That's not the case with Zieger, as the Red Sox learned the hard way in Anaheim Thursday night.

3) The Red Sox wisely took advantage of Jered Weaver on the bases

Weaver's high leg kick and reliance on off-speed pitches make for a slow delivery time to the plate. Dustin Pedroia would have easily stole second in the first but made the mistake of going into his slide too far ahead of the bag, and though initially ruled safe, was deemed out after a replay challenge.

In the sixth, Xander Bogaerts, was more successful in his stolen base. Neither steal led to a run, but the Sox did put some additional pressure on Weaver