Joe Paterno's will is now public


Joe Paterno's will is now public

From Comcast SportsNet
BELLEFONTE, Pa. (AP) -- Joe Paterno's will left his personal property to wife Sue and established a trust for the remainder of his estate. The documents released by the family Thursday to The Associated Press include the original seven-page will filed in 1997. The material didn't state how much Paterno or his estate were worth. The Hall of Fame football coach died of cancer in January at age 85, less than three months after being ousted by university trustees in November as part of the fallout over the arrest of retired defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky on child sex abuse charges. The family released the will the same day Sandusky's trial wrapped up its first week in Centre County court. The (Wilkes-Barre) Citizens' Voice reported Sunday that Paterno's will had been sealed by a county judge in April upon request of the estate. "The request was entirely appropriate and totally consistent with the actions of other prominent individuals," the family said in a statement issued through a spokesman. "The only objective was to preserve a measure of privacy for Sue Paterno, their five children, 17 grandchildren and other family members. "In an effort to ensure maximum transparency and eliminate unfounded speculation, the family has decided to make the will publicly available," the family added. They said they would petition the court to unseal all future filings. Sue Paterno was named "personal representative" of the will. The family also released a two-page codicil -- or amendment -- filed in 2010 that named the Paternos' daughters, Mary Kay and Diana, in that order, as the personal representatives if their mother was unable to do so. There is a "clamor of transparency" anytime public documents are sealed without cause or explanation, said Larry Holeva, managing editor of the Citizens Voice and the (Hazleton) Standard-Speaker. "This wasn't about Joe Paterno, simply about ensuring that public documents remain public." Paterno began working at Penn State as an assistant coach in 1950 before being promoted to head coach in 1966. He held Division I records for head-coaching tenure at one school and career victories, with 409. He typically shied away from media questions about his salary and compensation. But the university was compelled to release his salary in 2007 after losing an open records lawsuit. The school's 2011 filing valued Paterno's compensation at just more than 1 million -- a veritable bargain for a coach with two national championships on his resume. Alabama's Nick Saban, for instance, makes more than 5 million a year. Paterno's family last month released details of his state pension, valued at 13.4 million for his 61-year career at Penn State. At the same time, the family also said last month it planned to donate 1.5 million to Penn State-related and State College-area charities. The university in April announced it had agreed to provide millions in payments and benefits to Paterno's estate and family under the late coach's employment contract. Included were four checks worth a total of more than 3 million to cover the season, bowl game and entire career, the university said. Despite the payout, the Paternos did not sign away their right to sue, the family's lawyer said.

Butler imitates Brown with post-interception dance: 'Nothing personal'


Butler imitates Brown with post-interception dance: 'Nothing personal'

Malcolm Butler didn't mean any disrespect. After all, imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. 


When the Patriots corner picked off a Landry Jones pass in the first quarter -- one that was intended for receiver Antonio Brown -- Butler stood up in the end zone, faced the Heinz Field crowd, stuck one arm in the air a and gyrated like someone had attached jumper cables to his facemask. 

He was doing his best to mimick one of Brown's well-known touchdown dances.

"Me and Brown had conversation before," Butler said, "and it was a joke to him once I showed him how I do it. Much love for that guy. Nothing personal."

For Butler, it was the highlight of what was a productive afternoon. The third-year corner was asked to shadow Brown for much of the day, and he allowed Brown to catch five of nine targets for 94 yards. He also broke up a pair of passes intended for Brown's teammates.

“Stopping Antonio Brown, that’s impossible," Butler said. "You can’t stop him. You can only slow him down. I just went out there and tried to compete today . . . Great players are going to make plays but you have to match their intensity.”
Even on the longest throw from backup quarterback Landry Jones to Brown, a 51-yarder, it appeared as though Butler played the coverage called correctly. 

Butler lined up across from Brown and trailed him underneath as Brown worked his jway from the left side of the field to the right. Butler was looking for some help over the top in that scenario, seemingly, but because Brown ran across the formation, it was hard for the back end of the defense to figure out who would be helping Butler. 

Belichick admitted as much after the game. 

"He was on [Brown] a lot the way we set it up," Belichick said. "Look, they've got great players. They're tough to cover. They hit us on a couple over routes, in cut where they kind of ran away from the coverage that we had. 

"The plays were well designed. Good scheme, good thorws and obviously good routes by Brown. They got us on a couple, but I thought we competed hard. We battled all the way. We battled on third down. We battled in the red area. They made some. We made some, but they're good. They have a lot of good players."

And Brown, in particular, is about as close as it gets to unstoppable in the NFL. Butler found that out in Week 1 of last year when he matched up with Brown in his first game as a starter, giving up nine catches for 133 yards to the All-Pro wideout. 

Though Sunday might not have been perfect for Butler, it was better than that day about 14 months ago. And at times, it was worth dancing about. 

SUNDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL: Seahawks, Cardinals miss OT FGs, tie 6-6


SUNDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL: Seahawks, Cardinals miss OT FGs, tie 6-6

GLENDALE, Ariz. (AP) Seattle's Stephen Hauschka and Arizona's Chandler Catanzaro missed short field goals that would have won the game in overtime and the Seahawks and Cardinals settled for a 6-6 tie Sunday night.

Hauschka's 27-yard field goal was wide left with seven seconds left after Catanzaro's 24-yarder bounced off the left upright.

The tie was the Cardinals' first since Dec. 7, 1986, a 10-10 draw at Philadelphia when the franchise was based in St. Louis. It was the first for the Seattle since entering the NFL in 1976.

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