Jason Kidd is in some trouble for DWI

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Jason Kidd is in some trouble for DWI

From Comcast SportsNet
Jason Kidd mentoring Jeremy Lin was a nice story last week. Then Kidd was arrested on a drunken-driving charge, Lin's departure from New York for a "ridiculous contract" in Houston became more realistic, and a position of strength suddenly was one of turbulence for the Knicks. Kidd's arrest came within hours of the Knicks agreeing to a trade for fellow point guard Raymond Felton, raising the possibility they will refuse to match Lin's offer sheet with the Rockets. Police said Kidd crashed his SUV into a telephone pole in the Hamptons on Sunday, days after signing with the Knicks. Treated at a hospital for minor injuries after the crash, Kidd was arraigned on a misdemeanor driving-while-intoxicated charge and released without bail, Southampton Town police said. Phone and email messages were left seeking comment from Kidd's agent. His attorney, Ed Burke Jr., said in a statement that Kidd was returning from a charity function before his accident, had pleaded not guilty to the DWI charge and was awaiting further court proceedings. The Knicks, who signed the 10-time All-Star in free agency last week, had no immediate comment. Nor would they comment on their plans for Lin, even as speculation grew that Linsanity was headed elsewhere. Kidd, 39, was alone in the 2010 Cadillac Escalade when it hit a pole and veered into the woods around 2 a.m. in Water Mill, police said. Water Mill is a serene, mainly residential community east of Southampton Village. Kidd's next court date wasn't immediate available. The DWI charge carries the potential for up to a year in jail. The Knicks signed Kidd away from the Dallas Mavericks in a deal that will pay him about 3 million a year. Kidd had played in New Jersey, leading the Nets to two NBA Finals appearances, before being traded to Dallas and remains fond of the New York City area, where his children continue to live. The two-time Olympic gold medalist has been in trouble with the law before. While playing with Phoenix in 2001, he was arrested on a domestic violence charge, acknowledging he struck his former wife. Kidd is second on the NBA's career lists for assists and steals. Coach Mike Woodson said Kidd, who helped the Mavericks win the 2011 NBA championship, would be a good tutor and backup for Lin, whom he said would open next season as the starting point guard. Now he may not even be in New York. The Knicks have repeatedly said they would match any offer for Lin, but the Rockets made it difficult with a three-year, 25 million deal that's worth about 15 million in the third year. New York has until 11:59 p.m. EDT on Tuesday to match the offer sheet for the restricted free agent. Asked if he could envision Lin being with the Knicks next season, All-Star forward Carmelo Anthony said: "At this point there's a lot going on. I stay away from that part right now. I would love to see him back, but I think he has to do what's best for him right now." Anthony, speaking before practice with the U.S. Olympic team, was then reminded it's up to the Knicks, not Lin, to decide whether he stays or goes. "It's not up to me," Anthony said with a laugh. "It's up to the organization to say they want to match that ridiculous contract that's out there." The Knicks wouldn't comment on their plans and never even confirmed whether they had received the offer sheet from Houston to start the three-day clock for matching the offer. Felton played well in half a season for the Knicks before he was dealt to Denver in February 2011 as part of the package for Anthony. He struggled this season in Portland, briefing losing his starting job, but was considered an option for the Knicks if they couldn't land Steve Nash or Kidd to play with Lin. Now it may be Kidd and Felton.

Thursday’s Red Sox-Rays lineups: Benintendi (DL), Ortiz (day off) out

Thursday’s Red Sox-Rays lineups: Benintendi (DL), Ortiz (day off) out

David Ortiz and Andrew Benintendi are of of the lineup as the Red Sox close out their four-game series, and 11-game road trip, with a matinee (1:10 p.m.) against the Tampa Bay Rays at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg.

Benintendi was placed on the 15-day disabled list Thursday. He sustained a sprained knee while running the bases in the seventh inning of an eventual 11-inning loss to the Rays on Wednesday night. He had MRI Thursday morning and the Red Sox medical staff will review the results when the team returns to Boston. 

It’s a day off for Ortiz, who will be replaced at DH by Hanley Ramirez, who had the night off Wednesday. Travis Shaw starts at first base.

With Benintendi out, Chris Young, who came off the DL on Monday, will start in left field. Left-hander Drew Pomeranz (10-9, 2.95 ERA) is on the mound for the Red Sox, who are trying to take three of four from the Rays to finish the trip 8-3. Right-hander Jake Odorizzi (8-5, 3.63) starts for the Rays. 

RED SOX

Dustin Pedroia 2B

Xander Bogaerts SS

Mookie Betts RF

Hanley Ramirez DH

Jackie Bradley Jr. CF

Chris Young LF

Aaron Hill 3B

Travis Shaw 1B

Bryan Holaday C

Drew Pomeranz LHP

 

RAYS

Logan Forsythe 2B

Kevin Kiermaier CF

Evan Longoria 3B

Brad Miller 1B

Matt Duffy SS

Logan Morrison DH

Scott Souza RF

Mike Mahtook LF

Luke Maile C

Jake Odorizzi RHP

 

 

Red Sox place Benintendi (knee) on 15-day DL

Red Sox place Benintendi (knee) on 15-day DL

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- The Red Sox said Thursday that they still don't have a definitive diagnosis on Andrew Benintendi's injured left knee -- but they know enough to place the rookie outfielder on the disabled list.

Benintendi underwent an MRI Thursday morning and the results were being sent back to the Red Sox medical staff in Boston -- led by team orthopedist Dr. Peter Asnis - to be reviewed.

Marco Hernadnez was recalled from Pawtucket to take Benintendi's spot on the roster.

"The initial read down here was enough to place him on the disabled list,'' said John Farrell. "To what severity the injury is, I don't have that exactly. That will be determined after the review by Dr. Asnis and people back in Boston.''

Benintendi injured his knee on the basepaths in the seventh inning of Wednesday's 4-3 loss to Tampa Bay. The outfielder attempted to elude a tag and return to second base when he wrenched his knee and rolled his ankle.

Asked if Benintendi's injury could be season-ending, Farrell said: "That's probably too early to tell. We're hope that it's not. We've just got to wait and see what comes out of this. And then depending on the findings, what is the safest thing for Andrew to get him back on the field. Optimistically, it's still this year.''

Farrell said there's little swelling and that Benintendi slept fairly well. He also noted that the ankle -- which he rolled -- isn’t a problem.

"Those are the positives,'' he said.

Boston has used seven players in left field this year -- Benintendi, Chris Young, Brock Holt, Blake Swihart, Rusney Castillo, Ryan LaMarre and Bryce Brentz.

Benintendi, Young, Swihart and Holt have all spent time on the DL, leading the manager to refer to the position as a "kind of a Bermuda triangle unfortunately...it's been little bit of a dark hole.''

Farrell said Young will get the majority of playing time in  left, according to Farrell. Holt will also see some playing time, though he won't necessarily play against all right-handers.

Hernandez, meanwhile, will serve as another utility option in the infield.

"We'll mix and match out there,' said Farrell. "But CY will probably get a good portion of the at-bats [in left].’’

Farrell added that, regardless of who gets the playing time in left, the Sox need others in the lineup to step forward.

"We need guys to revert back to their normal contributions,'' Farrell said. "We've been in a dry spell of late...We've got a few guys who are  in a little bit of rut since the All-Star break.''

Shortstop Xander Bogaerts is an obvious example, having gone just 10-for-41 on the long road trip. Jackie Bradley is another who's slumping, with just six hits in his last 36 at-bats. Finally, Travis Shaw is 3-for-20.

Upside or experience? Belichick says, 'That's the $64,000 question'

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Upside or experience? Belichick says, 'That's the $64,000 question'

FOXBORO -- The Patriots roster doesn't have to be trimmed down to 75 players until Aug. 30., but they're already at 81 players, which includes the four on the physically unable to perform list at the moment. Five days before the first cut-down deadline, the Patriots are already close to where they need to be. 

The question is, why? Why not keep players around for a few extra days to see what they can do? If it's certain they won't make the team, why not release them and sign other long-shot free agents for what would essentially amount to a multi-day tryout? The Patriots turn over the bottom of their roster as frequently, if not more frequently, than any other team in the league. Why aren't they maximizing their roster space?

The answer is that they want to maximize the reps they can give to players who are already under team control. If the roster is crowded, that might mean less of a look at legitimate potential contributors in practice or against the Panthers in Carolina on Friday night. Having open spots on the roster early in the cut-down process also allows the Patriots to pounce on a player, or several, who may be released before the deadline.

Belichick shed some light on his thought process on roster moves at this time of year during a press conference earlier in the week.

"Well, we’re definitely going to have to trim it down," Belichick said. "We may release players before [Aug. 30], before the [Panthers] game. Again, there is a lot of personnel movement going on at this time of year. We could acquire a player, or two, or whatever if the situation was right. I really don’t know what’s going to happen. It’s not like I have five roster moves waiting back there in the office that are about to happen. That’s definitely not the case. But look, it could be in 10 minutes, I don’t know, or it could not be. 

"But the intent of doing what we’ve done with the roster is because of where we are, what we feel like is best for our team at this point in time -- although I think that some of the moves that we made are also best for some of the players as well, to be honest with you. Not that that’s the main reason that we did it, but it’s a part of the residual of doing what’s right for everybody. But yeah, we’ll just have to see how it goes.

"We could have 84 or 85 [players] by the end of the week or we could have 80 by the end of the week, 78, I don’t know. We’ll just have to see how it plays out. Obviously injuries, they’re a factor at this time of year for every team so there are some positions where you need depth, some positions where you have depth and you can’t play everybody. I think that’s definitely the case, and in some positions for us we have more players than we can really play against Carolina, so if we’re not going to play them, and then we’re going to have to release them at the 75 cut after the game, then there is an argument to just doing that now, which gives the player an opportunity that kind of clears it up for us a little bit. I think there is some of that."

The Patriots released a handful of veterans in recent days, including receiver Nate Washington, corner EJ Biggers, defensive lineman Frank Kearse and running back Donald Brown. In Brown's case, an injury forced him to lose practice time that he was not going to be able to make up. For the others, they were buried on the depth chart, and the team may have assumed that it would have been too tough for them to see meaningful snaps against Carolina given there were younger players at their positions who needed further in-game evaluation.

It's a tricky balancing act, Belichick explained, particularly when there are players of varying experience at the same spot. Do you keep the young guy who is the project, particularly if you think you might lose him to another team if he hits the waiver wire? Or do you go with the veteran to win in the here-and-now?

"That’s the $64,000 question," Belichick said. "That’s what it is. It’s been like that since the day I got into this league. From all of the personnel meetings I’ve ever been in it’s a [matter of] a player who’s more experienced [and] more ready to help the team now, versus a player that’s not as ready now but at some point you think the pendulum will swing in his favor. Will you do that? Can you do that? What are the consequences of making that move? What are the consequences of not making that move? How likely, as you said, is it that you could keep both players in some capacity?

"That’s what it’s about, trying to balance now with later. We’re going to field a team in November, we’re going to field a team next year, we’re going to field a team in 2018. Not that we’re getting too far ahead of ourselves, but we’re going to be in business in those years, so we have to sort of have an eye on those moving forward and a lot of the other factors that go into that. Those are all tough decisions. They’re all things that you really have to think about."

Every year there are examples of those kinds of choices. This year, one that comes to mind is a decision that could be coming at the tight end position.

AJ Derby, now in his second season, has been one of the team's most impressive players during the preseason, but if he makes the team he'll be buried on the depth chart behind Rob Gronkowski and Martellus Bennett. If he doesn't make the team, it's likely another club will claim him on waivers. Clay Harbor, now in his seventh season, can play a variety of roles and might be more equipped to help the Patriots immediately. He was given $400,000 in guaranteed money this offseason to do just that. 

There is the possibility that the Patriots keep both, but the team may believe there's only room for one.

Even for Belichick and the Patriots, who have developed their program since 2000, there are no hard and fast rules. Though Belichick has the final say, the disagreements among individuals helping to make the roster decisions can be difficult to sort out. 

"Some people in the room want to have one opinion, other people have another opinion," Belichick said. "You kind of have a split camp there and both sides’ arguments are good arguments. It’s kind of your perspective. Is it today or is it tomorrow? I’m sure every team in the league is having a lot of those discussions."

Given their roster reduction over the last few days, the Patriots are apparently having some of those discussions a little early.