Jacobs: The Cup is on loan

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Jacobs: The Cup is on loan

BOSTON -- Before hockey officially got started in Boston on Saturday night, Bruins owner Jeremy Jacobs released a statement and also spoke to the media.

The statement not only apologized for the lockout, but it also let fans know that the organization is serious about a Stanley Cup run this season.

"Like all of you, I wanted nothing more than to have the season start on time in October," said Jacobs in the statement. "Make no mistake -- it should have. The fact that we were unable to reach an agreement until just recently, is a disappointment.

"I want to personally apologize to our fans and others who depend on this team for their livelihood. But these are just words. The best way to make it up to you is to play hard and win."

The Los Angeles Kings are the defending Stanley Cup champs this season. But Jacobs reminded everyone who won it the year before.

"I said last year after our playoff exit that the Stanley Cup is on loan," said Jacobs. "I really meant it.We have a strong team and one that I believe will be very competitive this season. I expect us to contend for the Cup. We have 48 games in 96 days before the playoffs.

"It's no longer a marathon -- it's truly a sprint."

Jacobs believes this Bruins team is well-equipped to win it all again.

"But our advantage -- and it's a significant one -- is that we know how to win," said Jacobs. "I remember asking our players a few years ago how many of them had won the Cup. Just a few of our players raised their hand. Before the start of the last season I asked the same question. Nearly everyone raised their hand.

"We want this for our team. We want this for our fans. We know what victory feels like and we want that feeling again. I can think of no better way to bring our team back together than to focus on our shared goal of winning another Stanley Cup for Boston, New England, and Bruins fans around the world."

As for the effects of the lockout, Jacobs is optimistic that the 3.3 billion in revenue that was lost will be returned by next year. Still, he believes some damage to the game has been done.

"Not permanently, but I think that we've done damage," said Jacobs. "Some of these lockouts make no sense. We really try and make this work. You always lose people in these environments.

"Let me talk about the players' association, let me talk about league situations, and let me make this observation: nobody won. But more importantly, nobody lost at this point . . . This is a game, and we did hurt the game. We didn't just hurt Boston. We hurt the game of hockey."

Some have vilified Jacobs as being one of the main reasons for "hurting" the game of hockey with another lockout. But Jacobs said on Saturday that he was the "last person" that wanted to shut the game down.

"First of all, you're not in a position -- when you're going through all of this -- to defend yourself," said Jacobs. "It really is not constructive to the process.

"I'm coming off winning a Stanley Cup. I've got a sold-out building. I have a financially-sound business. No debt. Ownership for 37 years. I'm the last guy that wants to shut this down, absolutely the last one out there.

"There's a couple of Canadian teams -- I'm not going to name them -- that irrespective are going to be very successful. But, this is a very successful franchise. I don't want this to shut down. Unfortunately, I play in a league with 30 teams. And when I step back and look at what's going on with the broadest sense of the league, I've got to play a role constructively in that way."

Quotes, notes and stars: Pomeranz 'made one pitch that hurt' Red Sox

Quotes, notes and stars: Pomeranz 'made one pitch that hurt' Red Sox

BOSTON - Quotes, notes and stars from the Red Sox' 4-2 loss to the Detroit Tigers:

QUOTES:

"He pitched as we had anticipated at the time of the trade.'' - John Farrell on Drew Pomeranz.

"I had a good curveball and I was locating my fastball a lot better. I was in a lot better counts all night, but I made one pitch that hurt us.'' - Pomeranz on his outing.

"He was able to limit the damage against a very good offensive team. He pitched well enough to win. I just wish we could have put more runs on the board for him.'' - Jackie Bradley Jr. on Pomeranz.

 

NOTES:

* Until Monday night, the Red Sox had won their last six series openers.

* Drew Pomeranz has allowed four or fewer hits in 12 of his 18 starts this season.

* Eleven of Travis Shaw's last 15 hits have been for extra bases.

* Jackie Bradley Jr. had his 25th multi-hit game.

* Sandy Leon is hitting .500 (11-for-22) with runners in scoring position.

* The Red Sox are 21-21 in games decided by two or fewer runs.

* Dustin Pedroia (walk, single) has reached base in 28 straight games.

* Xander Bogaerts has 133 hits through 97 games. Since 1940, only Wade Boggs (134 in 1983; 135 in 1987) and Adrian Gonzalez (135 in 2011) had more.

STARS:

1) Justin Verlander

Verlander has enjoyed a bounce-back season of sorts this year, and the Red Sox got to see it up close Monday night as Verlander limited them a single run over six innings.

2) Jose Iglesias

The former Red Sox shortstop haunted his old team with a two-run homer in the sixth to put the Tigers ahead to stay.

3) Drew Pomeranz

The lefty absorbed the loss, but pitched well enough to win, giving up two runs in six innings while striking out seven.