If Ron Karkovice wasn't a jerk

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If Ron Karkovice wasn't a jerk

By Mary Paoletti
CSNNE.com

The Diamond Hoggers blog attempted to do an interview with former MLB catcher Ron Karkovice. Despite DH's best efforts to give fans an insightful look into the guy's mediocre career, Karkovice was a total jerk.

Need an illustration? When I searched "Ron Karkovice" on apimages.com, this photo came up:

Take that however you'd like.

Anyway, we felt badly for the Diamond Hoggers and so decided to fill in Karkovice's answers a little bit. It was a wrong that needed to be made right.

The questions are DH's inquiries, completely untouched. Original Ron Karkovice answers are in red. Our non-idiot stuff is in black.

DH: Who was your best friend in baseball or did you have a teammate that you enjoyed playing with most?
RK: Alex Fernandez was probably my dearest friend in baseball -- hell of a guy. Did you know that he's now the director of baseball operations at Archbishop McCarthy High School in Southwest Ranches, Florida. Whitney Houston was so right: "I believe the children are our future. Teach them well and let them lead the way."

DH: What was it like playing with Frank Thomas?
RK: It was great to watch Frank Thomas hit every day. He had such tremendous power. But the guy is actually a great big Teddy Bear. You should hear some of the pranks he played in the clubhouse. That rascal!

DH: Who was the toughest big league pitcher you ever faced and what made it so tough?
RK: The toughest pitcher I ever faced was Dave Stieb, hands down. Stieb's stuff was so good, I could not pick up the ball. He made me want to be a better hitter. I owe him a lot. That 20 home run season? Stieb motivated me. Falling off -- way, way off -- was kind of a bummer.

DH: Do you still follow the Sox or watch a lot of baseball? Whos your pick for the World Series this season?
RK: Yes, I do still watch the White Sox when I can. That old nostalgia always seems to creep in when the weather gets warmer. Smiles I'll be interested to see how they do against the Yankees. Everybody thinks New York will win. Do they have a tough team? Every season. Are they champions this season? I don't think so.

DH: Do you have any good Carlton Fisk or Tom Seaver stories? both former teammates of yours?
RK: You know, it's funny, but even though Fisk was such a character, I don't have any stories about my former teammate. Isn't that weird? And, no, nothing about Tom Seaver either. I know that it's bizarre -- seemingly impossible, even. Oh, well! Laughs

DH: You played your whole career in the Windy City, what did you like most about Chicago?RK: I consider myself so lucky to have spent my entire career in Chicago. The city is amazing, really, with all the restaurants, shops and culture. Have you ever been to the Museum of Science and Industry? Phenomenal. And the fans, of course, are a huge reason why I enjoyed my time there so much.

DH: What was your favorite road city to play in?RK: I know it's not a city, but back when the Angels were "The California" Angels, I loved playing out there. The Pacific ocean is incomprehensibly beautiful. Makes you believe that God exists, you know?

DH: Would you vote for Roger Clemens to get in the Hall of Fame?RK: Wow. That's a tough question; I would have to think about that. The things Roger accomplished are amazing, but the steroids issue makes this decision more like a battle. It's truly sad what the controversy has done to the game of baseball.

DH: What are your interests other than baseball?RK: Call me romantic, but, it's just baseball! It's my life; I was but a willing servant to the sport. Sometimes when I think about how lucky I was to play ball for a living... well.... I get a little emotional.

DH: What is the thing you miss most about being a big leaguer?RK: Well, can I say 'everything?' Chuckles ruefully That's probably too simple of an answer. I'd have to say that I miss the camaraderie the most. My team mats coughs, clears throat-- pardon me, teammates -- were my brothers; I miss them terribly. You can never understand the bond of a baseball team unless you're blessed enough to live it.

Heinen looking to show his offense in his shot on Krejci line

Heinen looking to show his offense in his shot on Krejci line

BRIGHTON, Mass – The Bruins mixed things up with their roster a bit on Saturday after dropping a couple of games in a row to Washington and Colorado. 

Fourth-line energy winger Noel Acciari and playmaking forward Danton Heinen were called up from Providence and will be in the lineup against the Toronto Maple Leafs at TD Garden on Saturday night. 
Acciari went to Providence the past couple of days to get some game action in after missing the past month with a lower body injury, but clearly showed he’s ready to go. 

So, Acciari is back to provide the same hard-hitting and energy he showed before he was hurt and Heinen is looking to show off a little more offense than in his first stint with the Black and Gold this season. He’ll be featured in a top role as left wing with David Krejci and David Backes and with marching orders to shoot the puck like he never shot it in his previous stint in Boston. 

For the Bruins, it’s about getting another look at a candidate to play left wing beside Krejci with both Ryan Spooner and Tim Schaller, with limitations to their respective games, unable to fully grasp that same opportunity. 

“My hope is that Heinen can come in and give us some good hockey. He’s a skill player and he’s been down there for a while, and he’s back up again because he’s been playing well,” said Claude Julien of the Bruins rookie, who had four goals and seven points in his past five games with Providence. “Hopefully he can play well here also. It’s about getting some confidence. When he went down to [the AHL] the pace of his game had to get a little bit better, and in the battles coming up with the puck along the walls. Those are the kinds of things we thought he could work on down in Providence.”

Heinen knows he needs to shoot the puck a bit more to show off his offense after a seven-game stint with the Bruins where he went scoreless, was a minus-2 and had just six shots on net.

“Being hard on the walls, playing fast and shooting the puck, those were all things I was working on [in Providence],” said Heinen, who has seven goals and 13 points in 13 games for the P-Bruins after being assigned to Providence. “I was doing what they told me to do [in Providence] and that’s shoot the puck. They were going in, and I was getting some good opportunities on the power play. It’s seriously tough to get chances [at the NHL level], so you can’t pass them up when you have chances. That was kind of my focus down there.”

Fellow fourth-line energy winger Anton Blidh has been shipped to Providence after three solid games with the Black and Gold. 

Julien said Blidh goes back to Providence having adequately shown that he can play in the NHL. He clearly showed the Bruins that he understands his role as a player that stirs things up a bit and gets his nose dirty on a regular basis.

“[Blidh] was fine. No issues there. He does his job. He plays with lots of energy and obviously he’s getting more experience. He’s a lot better at understanding his positioning within the game and what he has to do,” said Julien. “I thought he helped us out for the time that he was here.”

With Heinen and Acciari both in the lineup and Blidh back in Providence, that means Jimmy Hayes will be scratched after dressing for three of the past four games for Boston.

PFT: Belichick can still diagram his dad’s Navy plays from 1959

PFT: Belichick can still diagram his dad’s Navy plays from 1959

CBS interviewed Patriots coach Bill Belichick and 1960 Heisman winner Joe Bellino from Navy as part of its Army-Navy Game coverage Saturday.

Belichick's father, Steve, was an assistant coach at Navy when Bellino played there, and little Bill, then 7, took it all in. So much so, that 57 years later, Belichick can still diagram the 27 F Trap play that his dad used to drew up in the 1959 season for Bellino.

More from NBC Sports' Pro Football Talk here.