Hockey versus baseball

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Hockey versus baseball

By Jon Fucile
WickedGoodSports.com

As hockey season approaches and the Bruins get ready to defend their title, the Red Sox are doing their best to become the highest paid team to not make the playoffs since... well, the last time they did it.

The Red Sox find themselves in a bit of role reversal. The Bruins are the toast of Boston and all the Sox bandwagon fans have raided the pro shop and snapped up every Seguin and Lucic shirt they can find while the Red Sox bandwagon is about as full as a Florida Marlins game.

The Bruins winning and the Red Sox floundering isnt the only difference between the two teams and the two sports.

For example, the Red Sox are in the middle of a playoff race and the Rays are catching up to them. You would think every member of the team would be going all out to break out of their slump and get into the playoffs on a high note. Unfortunately, that isnt the case.

Hockey players, on the other hand, are a different breed. A manlier breed. Take for example the case of Mark Recchi. The setting: Game 7. The situation: KIDNEY STONES! Hockey players are brutalized in the playoffs. They take hit after hit after hit. So Recchi sat that game, right?

WRONG! Hockey 1, Baseball 0

When baseball players have an issue with each other, they usually turn to the pitcher to throw a fast ball at the opponents head at which point the benches clear, people pretend to fight while they stare each other down while failing to look tough and then throw the occasional slap. Sad.

When hockey players feel their teammates are wronged, they go right up to the offender and they certainly dont slap each other.

JUSTICE! Hockey 2, Baseball 0

Take a look at baseball managers. They wear uniforms. UNIFORMS! Why? Theyre not playing. Theyre chewing gum and making crazy hand signals. They just look silly.

Now take a look at a hockey coach. Hes patrolling the bench in a suit and tie looking classy and sophisticated. Is he a coach? Is he James Bond!? Who knows!

007! Hockey 3, Baseball 0

In baseball, if a pitcher goes all nine innings it is considered a great accomplishment. Why? Isnt that their job? Youre a pitcher! Oh boo hoo they pitch every five days! Waaaaaaaaaaaaah. Grow a pair!

Your average NHL goalie starts 50-60 games a year and each night gets hit roughly thirty times with a frozen piece of rubber going upwards of 90mph. Unless their name is Roberto Luongo, a good starting goalie is barely ever pulled. They just keep going and going and loving it the whole time because they are warriors.

WARRIOR! Hockey 4, Baseball 0

We could keep going and going, but we just watched two innings of a baseball game and were really sleepy.

Shaughnessy: Everything Farrell does blows up in his face, particularly in 8th inning

Shaughnessy: Everything Farrell does blows up in his face, particularly in 8th inning

Dan Shaughnessy joins Sports Tonight to discuss Rick Porcello giving up a game-tying homerun in the 8th, and explains why John Farrell has been very unlucky with any decision he makes.

First impressions: Benintendi injured in Red Sox' 4-3 loss to Rays

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First impressions: Benintendi injured in Red Sox' 4-3 loss to Rays

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- First impressions from the Red Sox' 4-3 loss to the Tampa Bay Rays:

 

The injury to Andrew Benintendi looked ominous.

Benintendi's left leg buckled as he tried to elude a tag on the bases in the seventh inning. He left the game with the help of two trainers, hobbling badly.

The Sox later announced that Benintendi suffered a left knee sprain, and will be further evaluated Thursday.

It's impossible to determine how serious the injury is. The prognosis could be anywhere from a few days, to, potentially, a season-ending issue.

Regardless, it's a blow to the Sox, who clearly have benefited from Benintendi's athleticism and energy in the three weeks since he's been promoted from Double A.

 

Rick Porcello is gobbling up innings in the second half.

Porcello gave the Sox 7 2/3 innings Wednesday night, allowing three runs. It marked the sixth straight start in which Porcello provided the Sox with a minimum of seven innings.

Through the end of June, Porcello had pitched seven or more innings just four times. Since the start of July, he's done it seven times -- and came within an out of doing it in another start.

Porcello also extended his streak of pitching at least five innings to 34 straight starts, dating back almost a calendar year to Aug. 26 of last year. Of those 34, he's pitched at least six in 31 of those.

In fact, Porcello leads the majors in innings pitched since that streak began.

 

David Ortiz continues to amaze

In the first inning, Ortiz walloped a pitch into the right field seats for his 30th homer, giving the Sox a 2-0 lead three batters into the game.

The homer was significant beyond that, too. With it, Ortiz reached two milestones -- 30 homers and 100 RBI for the season.

It marked the fourth straight season in which Ortiz has reached both, and it also marked the 10th time as a member of the Sox that he had hit both plateaus.

The homer also meant that Ortiz is now the oldest player - at 40 years, 280 days old -- to hit 30 homers in a season. And finally, it gave Ortiz 100 RBI seasons with the Sox, passing Ted Williams, with whom he had shared the record of nine.

And, remarkably, there's more than a month left in the season to add on to those achievements.