Hard work is for losers, just ask Miami

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Hard work is for losers, just ask Miami

By Jon Fucile
Special contributor to WickedGoodSports.com

The Miami Heat have been the NBA's, and arguably the sports world's, hottest topic since the season opened. You all know the story of how Dwyane Wade, Chris Bosh and the weak willed LeBron James got together to form the greatest dynasty in NBA history and win eleven consecutive NBA titles!!!

Oh wait, that's just what they predicted. Sorry.

Unfortunately for the self absorbed trio, life has not been all lollipops and rainbows.

You all know by now that the Heat stars are upset because their coach is making them work too hard. Poor 'lil guys. They wanted to just hang out all day and high five, not practice or work hard on the court. The NBA, and all the other teams, should just hand them titles because they're so super awesome. Hard work is overrated. Maybe the three of them could go to schools and teach that to kids.

But their reaction got us thinking' what if other 'great' people throughout history decided they didn't want to work hard for their goals either? We decided to take a look.

What if our fore fathers did not feel like working hard? What if they just said fighting the British is too much work, let us give up and just let the British continue to rule us? What if Ben Franklin, Thomas Jefferson and Paul Revere said screw, let's go drink some tea and buy some red coats and get on this British bandwagon?

Instead of playing basketball James, Bosh and Wade would be wearing knickers and eating tea and crumpets.

What if Dr. James Naismith did not want to work hard?

For those of you who do not know, Dr. Naismith was a Canadian P.E. professor at the YMCA. One rainy afternoon he was trying to figure out how to keep his class active indoors and began to formulate what would become current day basketball.

He decided on the rules and then put up a peach basket for the kids to shoot into and thus the game of basketball was born.

But what if Dr. Naismith did not want to work hard? What if he was content to let the kids run wild in the gym while he just took a nap?

Chris Bosh, Lebron James and Dwyane Wade would probably have other jobs. Low impact jobs that require little to no work. Like testing hammocks.

To further complicate the problem for the the Heat, unlike in modern times when the ball simply falls back down through the net after a basket, the peach basket still had the bottom attached and the ball had to be manually retrieved. If the Miami Heat played in those days, they would never score more than 2 or 3 points. Getting the ball would probably be too much work.

Instead of shooting into a peach basket, Dwyane and LeBron would hang out in the hammock and make Bosh pick them peaches.

Millions of peaches. Peaches for free.

Evolution works hard every day. Both humans and animals are leagues ahead of where they used to be all thanks to the hard work of evolution.

But what if one day, back when people were evolving, evolution just said... you know what? People need to be taller, but that is just too much work?

Where would Bosh, Wade and James be today? Not playing basketball. They'd be too short!

That's right... acting gigs. Whenever a casting call would go out for "egotistic little people" they would be the first three to respond.

One day, somewhere in the history of dating, there was a couple who felt bad that one of their single friends had nothing to do every Friday and Saturday night. They took pity on their friend and started inviting them to come along on dates. The 'Third Wheel' was born.

But... where would Chris Bosh be if that couple thought it was too much work to ask their single friend to tag along?

He'd still be stuck in Toronto where nobody cares. And people might still think he's a great basketball player. Whoops.

Before games, LeBron James likes to dip his hands into a bowl of chalk and then toss it into the air in a "look at me! look at me! seriously everyone look at me!" display because apparently he did not get enough attention as a child.

But getting all that chalk is hard work! Someone has to get it for him, crush it into a fine powder and then deliver it to him.

But what if, one day, James' chalk fetcher decided it was too much work to get the chalk? What if LeBron just had to toss whatever he wasn't using into the air?

Although picking up all those things is probably too much work. He'd probably just take a nap.

The Heat also wish the guy who created the NBA playoffs didn't want to work hard. They were hoping the title would be awarded to the team with the biggest collective ego and sense of self importance without having to play any games.

So keep spreading the message that hard work and dedication is overrated. Keep acting like you should just be handed everything without working for it. And maybe, just maybe if kids don't work real hard, someday they can win nothing together but act like they're already the best team ever just like you.

Brown taking opportunities with Celtics as they come

Brown taking opportunities with Celtics as they come

BOSTON -- Compared to most high draft picks, Jaylen Brown doesn’t log a ton of minutes for the Boston Celtics.
 
Playing on an experienced team with legit hopes of making a deep playoff run, rookies seeing limited minutes is a given.
 
Knowing playing time will come in a limited supply, Brown understands all too well the importance of taking advantage of every opportunity he gets on the floor.
 
He did just that on Saturday in Boston’s 107-106 win over Philadelphia, and he hopes to do more of the same on Monday when the Celtics take on the Houston Rockets.
 
When you look at Brown’s stat line, nothing about it looks impressive. He played 15 minutes, scored two points with one rebound and one blocked shot.
 
But beyond the stats was the fact that he was on the floor for seven minutes in the fourth quarter in a close back-and-forth game on the road. Rookies on the floor in crunch time is not the norm in the NBA.
 
“It means a lot,” Brown told reporters after Saturday’s win. “I try to be as best I can be for my team; try to put my best foot forward every night out.”
 
And he did just that on Saturday.
 
In the fourth quarter with the Celtics leading 87-83, Brown blocked a Gerald Henderson shot that wound up in the hands of Jae Crowder. Moments later, Jonas Jerebko hit a 3-pointer that gave the Celtics their largest lead of the game, 90-83.
 
And just two minutes prior to the blocked shot, he was out in transition following an Isaiah Thomas steal and threw down a dunk that pushed Boston’s lead to 86-83 with 7:11 to play.
 
Brown acknowledged making the most of those opportunities bodes well for him and the franchise.
 
“It’s great for our team in general; not just for me,” Brown said. “Those plays helped us to pull the game out in the end. So I’m glad we got the win. I think we should have played a little better than we did.”
 
The continued pursuit of self-improvement is a hallmark of what Brown’s focus and desire are at this stage of his pro career. He has talked often about not wanting to be just one of the best in this draft class but also one of the best in the NBA overall.
 
But he’s also learned that to get there takes time and experience developing both physically and mentally. Part of that mental growth entails having the right approach to games.
 
“Usually you try to tell yourself not to mess up,” Brown said. “Now that I’m getting more comfortable, it’s just play basketball, bring energy, things like that; come out and do what you’re supposed to do. A lot of times you try to tell yourself to not mess up and it’s counteractive; just come out and play basketball and have fun.”
 
And by doing so the minutes will come.
 
“You can’t control that. I just have to control what I can control,” Brown said. “I trust coach (Brad Stevens); I trust my coaching staff. I have to come out and in the minutes I get, play my hand as best I can and take advantage of what I do get and impact this team as much as possible.”
 
This season, Brown is averaging 4.8 points, 2.0 rebounds while shooting 41.9 percent from the field.

Zolak: Bennett helps with Gronk loss, but Pats need to manage him

Zolak: Bennett helps with Gronk loss, but Pats need to manage him

Scott Zolak said on Pregame Live Sunday that the Patriots are better-suited to survive a season-ending injury to Rob Gronkowski than they were a season ago. 

Zolak said that given the health of Dion Lewis, Julian Edelman, Danny Amendola and the signing of Chris Hogan, the offense has more stability at other positions to make up for the loss of Gronkowski, whose season is over due to back surgery. As for the tight end position, Zolak said he feels the Patriots traded for Martellus Bennett to protect themselves against scenarios like the one they currently face. 

“This offseason they [acquired] Martellus Bennett, I think for this very reason: to prepare for what really happens year after year, is some sort of issue comes up with Rob Gronkowski and you have to play without him,” Zolak said.

Bennett was questionable with an ankle injury for this week’s game, but is expected to play. Asked about the health of Bennett, Zolak said that he believes the tight end is good to play, but that his importance to the team with Gronkowski out means the Pats will need to be careful. 

“I think he’s healthy enough to get through about 30-35 snaps,” Zolak said. “They’ve got to balance him now moving forward.”