Habs fans are the dumbest on the planet

Habs fans are the dumbest on the planet

By Jon Fucile
WickedGoodSports.com

Montreal Canadiens fans.

A phrase synonymous with crazy, idiotic, moronic....well, the list goes out.

Bruins captain Zdeno Chara drove Canadiens forward Max Pacioretty into the turnbuckle near the benches the other night, leaving Pacioretty with a severe concussion and a fractured vertebra.

Based on Chara's history there was likely no malice involved but that hasn't stopped crazy Canadiens fans from wishing death upon his family, friends and teammates. A perfectly non-insane reaction.

Hey, we agree. It sucks that Pacioretty got hurt. But really... you want Chara's kids to die in a fire? What kind of people are you? This is why no one respects Montreal. You're all bat poop crazy. But hey, thanks for helping Canada keep America's head warm.

Montreal is a city so stupid they use a soccer chant at hockey games. Oleee! Ole-ole-o -shut up. We get it. You want to be European, but you're too lame even for that.

This is a city that has set previous standards for stupidity. This is a city that has tipped cars.

..and set fires after a first round playoff victory.

Not a championship. A first round victory. Awesome guys. You stay classy, Montreal.

So it really shouldn't be a surprise that this classless, idiotic city again set the standard for stupidity.

Montreal cops were flooded with calls Tuesday night. Was there a shooting? A bank robbery? A suspicious character in a van dressed like a clown trying to lure children into a windowless van?

Nope. Montreal fans were calling the cops.... because they wanted the cops to arrest Chara and press charges.

No, seriously. We're not making it up.

Citizens of this fine city actually called the cops over something that happened in a hockey game.

Look, it sucks that Paciorettys injury was so severe. We hope he makes a full recovery and is able to resume his NHL career. We really do.

But Montrealers are really that dumb? What do you want? Do you want Chara chained up or something for making a hockey play?

The hit was very, very, VERY unfortunate. We dont deny that. Maybe Chara should have shown more awareness. Maybe emotion got the best of him. He is the only one that knows. But you people act like he tore down your city and should be executed.

It is not like Chara sat around and plotted the demise of Max Pacioretty. There were no grand plans to end a season and possibly a career.

Where was the outrage in Canada when Savard went down? Canadiens fans, classy as they are, openly mocked the Bruins and their fans. They laughed at Savard.

Where was the outrage when Pacioretty drove Mark Eatons head into the boards? Yes, the end result wasnt the same but the sentiment was. If Chara hits Pacioretty anywhere else on the ice, were looking at a simple interference call.

But you keep making death threats to Bruins bloggers and writers, Montreal. Keep Tweeting about how you hope Charas family dies or Tweeting about how you hope the Bruins plane blows up. Our opinion of you couldnt possibly be any lower.

Youre awful, awful people.

Dominique Wilkins reflects on his rivalry with Larry Bird

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Dominique Wilkins reflects on his rivalry with Larry Bird

During our series discussing the 1986 Boston Celtics, we have sat down with many players from that championship, along with members of the media that were close to the team.

This week features a few of the opponents that were very familiar with the 1980’s Celtics  - Atlanta Hawks legend Dominique Wilkins, former Celtics coach (and Hawk) Doc Rivers, and Lakers great James Worthy.

Bogaerts continues to battle through struggles with bat

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Bogaerts continues to battle through struggles with bat

BOSTON -- Early in 2016 praises were sung around the league that Xander Bogaerts was the best hitter in baseball.

Rightfully so. For a good portion of the season he led the league in both batting average and hits. But between Mookie Betts’ ascension and Bogaerts’ drop in average from .331 on 7/29 to .306 after Monday night’s game, he’s taken a back seat.

But the Red Sox shortstop’s month-long dry spell hasn’t been a straight decline. Although he was held hitless Monday, Bogaerts went 6-for-13 (.462) against Kansas City.

In fact, the 23-year-old doesn’t even consider the recent month of struggles the worst stretch of his career.

“2014 probably,” Bogaerts said, “yeah I had a terrible, terrible few months -- probably three months.”

That was of course the season a lot came into question surrounding the now All-Star shortstop, so he was pretty spot on. In 2014 Bogaerts went from hitting .304 through 5/31, to .248 by the end of June, .244 after his last game in July, all the way down to .224 by the last day of August.

Bogaerts would hit .313 that September and finish with a .240 average -- but more importantly, an appreciation of what he’d experienced.

“That definitely helped me become a better person, a better player -- and understanding from that and learning,” Bogaerts said.

From that experience, he gained a better understanding of the importance of maintaining a consistent day-to-day routine.

“That has to stay the same,” Bogaerts said without question in his voice. “The league adjusted, they adjusted to me. It kind of took a longer time to adjust to them. They’ve just been pitching me so differently compared to other years.”

Bogaerts has had the point reinforced to him throughout, with Red Sox assistant hitting coach Victor Rodriguez serving as one voice of reinforcement.

“When you have a routine from the mental side, physical side, when you struggle that’s when you really need that,” Rodriguez said. “He’s been so good with his daily preparation, it doesn’t matter the result of the game. He can always go to something that feels comfortable.”

“He’s been so comfortable and confident with his daily routine and preparation that it allows him -- when he doesn’t get the results he wants in the game -- to have some peace knowing that the next day, we’re going to go back to doing that again.”

It’s clear Bogaerts needs to maintain his daily routine to help work through slumps -- and maintain hot streaks -- but Rodriguez made it clear, consistent preparation from a hitter doesn’t magically cure every problem.

“That doesn’t mean that because you stick with the routine you’re going to have results,” Rodriguez said. “What it means is, [because] you know and believe in that routine that you know you’re going to get out of it.”

Which means in addition to sticking to his normal routine, Bogaerts also had to identify flaws elsewhere in order work through his problems. He came to realize the problem was more mechanically based than mental -- given he’d done everything to address that.

“They pitched me differently, and some stuff I wanted to do with the ball I couldn’t do,” Bogaerts said. “I just continued doing it until I had to make the adjustment back.”

Bogaerts isn’t fully out of the dark, but he’s taken steps in the right direction of late -- and is nowhere near the skid he experienced in 2014. He and Rodriguez fully believe the All-Star’s ability to maintain a clear mind will carry him through whatever troubles he’s presented with the rest of the way.

“The more stuff you have in you’re head is probably not going to help your chances,” Bogaerts explained, “so have a clear mind -- but also have the trust in your swing that you’re going to put a good swing on [the pitch] regardless of whatever the count is.”

Nick Friar can be followed on Twitter @ngfriar.