Giants re-sign postseason hero to 20 million deal

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Giants re-sign postseason hero to 20 million deal

From Comcast SportsNetSAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- Second baseman Marco Scutaro is staying in San Francisco, right where he wanted to be.The NL championship series MVP agreed to a 20 million, three-year contract with the Giants late Tuesday. Vice president of baseball operations Bobby Evans said only a physical was left to finalize the deal."He was a priority from Day One," Evans said. "He was a key part of our 2012 success and served as a tremendous veteran presence."Earlier in the evening, Scutaro had been weighing a two-year contract offer that included a vesting option -- but he was seeking a three-year deal to remain with the World Series champions. The Giants and Scutaro's representatives met Tuesday at the winter meetings in Nashville, Tenn.In other moves, the Giants exercised 2014 contract options on manager Bruce Bochy and GM Brian Sabean.The 37-year-old Scutaro batted .362 with three homers and 44 RBIs in 61 regular-season games with the Giants after he was acquired in a July 27 trade with Colorado. He frequently said how much he enjoyed playing for San Francisco and that he hoped he would return.The Giants suddenly have quite a familiar roster returning after making two big moves in as many days to keep their own free agents. On Monday, center fielder Angel Pagan agreed to a 40 million, four-year contract.Left-handed reliever Jeremy Affeldt received an 18 million, three-year contract on Nov. 14.Retaining Affeldt, Pagan and Scutaro were among the top priorities for Sabean and Evans this offseason.Giants CEO Larry Baer considered it a productive winter meetings -- and offseason so far -- for his busy club after already re-signing Affeldt last month. Winning the World Series for the second time in three seasons put San Francisco behind on its offseason plan again, though everyone in the front office would say that's a great problem to have."Culture is important, and Marco is a wonderful influence with our players, especially the Latin players," Baer said.The 31-year-old Pagan batted .288 with eight home runs, 56 RBIs and a San Francisco-best 15 triples in his first season with the Giants. Pagan said late in the season and again after the World Series parade that he hoped to return, but wanted to test free agency and sought some job security in the form of a multiyear deal.On Friday, Sabean said the club had made backup plans to move forward without Pagan or Scutaro in case neither decided to re-sign -- but progress with Pagan apparently happened during the weekend after Sabean said, "We don't have a deal, so that tells you we're not close."San Francisco declined Friday to tender a contract to closer Brian Wilson, the 2010 major league saves leader with 48. The right-hander is working his way back from a second Tommy John surgery on his pitching elbow.

Felger: Crazy can be good, but Sale needs to harness it

Felger: Crazy can be good, but Sale needs to harness it

Chris Sale brings with him to Boston some attitude. He also brings a measure of defiance and, perhaps, a little bit of crazy.

All of which the Red Sox starting staff just may need. And if Sale pitches as he has for much of the past five years, he'll probably be celebrated for it.

I still wonder how it will all play here, especially if he underachieves.

What would we do to him locally if he refused to pitch because he didn't like a certain kind of uniform variation the team was going with? What would we say if he not only refused to pitch, but took a knife to his teammates' uniforms and the team had to scrap the promotion? Sale did exactly that in Chicago last year, after which he threw his manager under the bus for not standing by his players and attacked the team for putting business ahead of winning.

All because he didn't want to wear an untucked jersey?

"(The White Sox throwback uniforms) are uncomfortable and unorthodox,'' said Sale at the time. "I didn't want to go out there and not be at the top of my game in every aspect that I need to be in. Not only that, but I didn't want anything to alter my mechanics. ... There's a lot of different things that went into it.''

Wearing a throwback jersey would alter his mechanics? Was that a joke? It's hard to imagine he would get away with that in Boston.

Ditto for his support of Adam LaRoche and his involvement of that goofy story last March.
 
LaRoche, you'll remember, retired when the White Sox had the nerve to tell him that his 14-year-old son could not spend as much time around the team as he had grown accustomed to. Sale responded by pitching a fit.

“We got bald-face lied to by someone we’re supposed to be able to trust,'' said Sale of team president Kenny Williams. ``You can’t come tell the players it was the coaches and then tell the coaches it was the players, and then come in and say something completely different. If we’re all here to win a championship, this kind of stuff doesn’t happen.”

On what planet does allowing a 14-year-old kid in a clubhouse have anything to do with winning a title? In what universe does a throwback jersey have anything to do with mechanics? If David Price had said things that stupid last year, he'd still be hearing about it. And it won't be any different for Sale.

Thankfully, Sale's defiance and feistiness extends to the mound. Sale isn't afraid to pitch inside and protect his teammates, leading the American League in hit batsmen each of the last two years. He doesn't back down and loves a fight. And while that makes him sound a little goofy off the field, it should play well on it.

In the meantime, the Sox better hope he likes those red alternate jerseys they wear on Fridays.

E-mail Felger at mfelger@comcastsportsnet.com. Listen to Felger and Mazz weekdays, 2-6 p.m. on 98.5 FM. The simulcast appears daily on CSN.