Getting our Phil of sports topics

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Getting our Phil of sports topics

By Michael Felger

It won't be anywhere near as twisted as a Tanguay's 10, but here's a Felger five-pack just the same.

1. I'm torn regarding the embarrassing Phil Kessel episode the other night at the NHL All-Star draft. In case you missed it, the former Bruin was picked last.

After watching that clip, and if you have an ounce of humanity, you had to feel badly for Kessel sitting there alone. Then came the uncomfortable post-draft interview ("Phil. Phil? Come on down here") and the awarding of a free car. All for being the schmuck. I didn't think that being the last pick of this draft would be a big deal, but I was wrong. That was sort of hard to watch. Awkward. Again, it's hard not to have some sympathy for him.

On the other hand, Kessel's lack of popularity among his peers is no fluke. He's earned it. That's what you get when you don't play hard, don't go into the corners and don't help your teammates in your own end. Kessel is being paid 5 million a year and is a minus-19. Sort of worthy of being picked last, don't you think? It's obvious the other players up on stage weren't shedding any tears -- that's for sure.

2. Given how it transpired with Kessel, the NHL may never do an All-Star draft again, which is too bad. It was great theatre for hockey junkies, certainly better than the game that took place yesterday.

In fact, if I were the NFL I'd be looking into something similar. Given the fantasy football mania that has griped this country, having a similar draw at the Pro Bowl would be an instant hit. Can't you just imagine Ray Lewis and Brian Urlacher pickings sides? Would it be Brady or Manning? or Brees or Rodgers? Polamalu or Reed? Revis or Asomugha?

Again, just like in hockey, it would be far more entertaining than the game itself.

Speaking of which, Bill Belichick has certainly lost his touch in January, hasn't he?

3. As has been the case in the past, the Patriots' greatest misstep in the Logan Mankins situation wasn't necessarily how they approached his contract at the end. It's how they approached it a few years prior.

It never had to come to this. The Pats signed him to a five-year rookie deal in 2005, and even though it was obvious Mankins would be a top interior lineman in the league early on in his career, the Pats let the months and years tick off the contract. If they had come to him a year early, or two years early, they certainly could have gotten him at a discounted rate. Yes, they would have had to come up with some new bonus money, but not as much as they do now. Remember, the price always goes up.

Instead, the Pats stubbornly held onto the leverage they owned on his rookie contract. Just like they did with Deion Branch (the first time). Just like they did with Asante Samuel. Just like they did with Vince Wilfork.

And now if they want Mankins back they'll have to be the high bidder, something they avoid like the plague. Or they'll have to franchise him, which is just asking for more trouble. Or they'll simply lose him, which would be frustrating. There's no reason why Logan Mankins shouldn't have been a Patriot for life.

Whatever the outcome, this isn't about the Pats being cheap. It's about them being stubborn. It's about asset management. They're generally pretty good with it, with a few notable exceptions. Unfortunately, Mankins is one.

4. How was Kevin Garnett NOT suspended for blatantly hitting Channing Frye in the nuggets in Phoenix on Friday? I mean, what do you have to do to earn a seat?

But hey, I'm just glad KG got to wear his special sneakers against the Lakers.

What a league.

5. While Kessel licks his wounds from the weekend, keep an eye on his Maple Leafs in the second half of the season. Remember, the Bruins' still have Toronto's first-rounder this summer, and the Leafs currently reside in 26th place. That means if the season ended today, the B's would be back in the lottery. A nice implosion by Toronto over the final two-plus months could very well give the B's another top two pick.

Meanwhile, eyes in Boston will be focused on what the other Toronto first-rounder from the Kessel trade netted: Tyler Seguin. He has seven goals heading into February, which is basically the same pace at which his dream comparison for B's fans, Stephen Stamkos, was at for the Lightning in 2008. Stamkos turned it on after that All-Star break, scoring 17 goals in the second half, and he's been one of the league's best offensive players since.

The Bruins can only hope Seguin comes close to that production.

E-mail Felger HERE and read the mailbag on Thursday. Listen to Felger on the radio, live this week from the Super Bowl in Dallas from 2-6 p.m. on 98.5 the Sports Hub.

Sullinger: It would be very hard to walk away from Celtics

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Sullinger: It would be very hard to walk away from Celtics

BOSTON - It’s easy to look at the Celtics - Hawks series and say that Jared Sullinger has no place on the Boston Celtics.

But that would mean ignoring an entire regular season in which Sullinger put together perhaps the best season of his career.

The C’s center averaged 10.3 points and 8.3 rebounds, and believe it or not was one of the more consistent and dependable players on the team, especially when it came to big men.

Having thought to be out of the rotation completely to begin the year, Sullinger ended up starting 73 of the 81 games he played, both career highs.

There were some weight issues, and that just might be the case for Sullinger for the rest of his career as he’s just a guy with a big frame. It may have caught up to him a bit towards the end of the season and into the playoffs, but more than anything else the Hawks just proved to be a bad matchup for him.

If Boston could have advanced to play the Cavs, history proves that Sullinger would have been an integral part in taking Kevin Love out of the game.

But it didn’t end that way for the Celtics, who were eliminated in six games. Sullinger was ineffective through those six games, and replaced by Jonas Jerebko as the C’s went small a few games into the series. Sullinger averaged just 13.5 minutes, 5.2 points, and 4.5 rebounds in the postseason.

Was it his last with the Celtics? Sullinger is a restricted free agent this summer, but it remains to be seen how interested the Celtics are in having him back. He made it c

“You don’t know what’s gonna happen so I really can’t speak upon the future, but if I leave it’s gonna be tough walking away from the great guys we have in this locker room,” Sullinger said Thursday after his team was eliminated. “I’m gonna take a couple of days just to reflect on this season and how far we came as a unit and just let everything take care of itself.”

Sullinger made it clear, much like his fellow free-agent teammate Evan Turner, that he’d like to be back with the Celtics.

“For sure,” Sullinger said. “When you spend four seasons in the same area and then play for the greatest organization of all time, you see the likes of Bill Russell sitting courtside, Kevin McHale, Bill Walton and all these people that cheer, it’s very hard to walk away from this situation.”

At just 24 years old, Sullinger has a lot of NBA ahead of him provided he can stay ahead of the curve. He knows he still has work to do.

“It was OK. I’ve got to do a lot of things better, but it was OK,” Sullinger said of his season. “My window is getting smaller and smaller of constantly talking about I need to improve, I need to improve.”