First-year Celtics share Boston driving experiences


First-year Celtics share Boston driving experiences

Driving in Boston can be challenging for newcomers to the area. Between one-way streets, ongoing road work, and unpredictable traffic jams, there is a learning curve when navigating around Beantown.   
First-year Celtics shared their driving experiences getting to the TD Garden, including the effects of extreme congestion prior to last Friday's home opener and early November snow on Wednesday.    
Darko Milicic  
"(Last Friday) it took me two hours to get here from where I come from. There was traffic. I don't know where these people are going. New York is ten times bigger than Boston. It's worse here and this city is ten times smaller than New York. I don't understand where these people are coming from. It's wasted time. I hate traffic. I left an hour-and-a-half early and I thought I'd be here in a half (hour). It sure wasn't enough because it took me two hours."

Courtney Lee  
"It snowed. I've seen it but I haven't driven in it in a while. It was crazy. Snowing already? ... Orlando and Houston (two of Lee's former NBA cities) don't compare to Boston. The only place that compares to navigating through Boston is New Jersey. It's kind of similar, especially with the New York side of it right there -- the traffic, one-way streets, the Mass Pike. I've gotten lost a couple times. It's a good thing Benz makes a great navigation system. It helps me out a lot."   

Fab Melo  
"Me and (former Celtics training camp invitee) Jamar (Smith) were trying to find our way to the Garden the first time we came. We could see the Garden by every angle, but we couldn't find the right exit. We didn't come. We had a duckboat tour and we couldn't find the way. We had a GPS. It didn't work, we didn't make it. Now I know my way to the Garden (laughs). It's good."   

Jared Sullinger  
"No, I haven't got lost. When you have an iPhone and you have all these good apps, it's only right that it helps you out. (Turns to lockermate Jeff Green, who got lost several times his first season in Boston, and smirks. "I didn't have an iPhone," Green retorted.) There's no similarities to driving in Ohio (Sullinger's home state). In Ohio, people can drive. In Boston, there's a lot of traffic so I feel like they can't drive but I've got to understand there's a lot of traffic so that naturally happens. It's really a slower pace here, due to traffic. I leave at 4 o'clock, 4:15 so I don't have to run into a 5 o'clock jam."   

Jason Collins  
"Last Friday, the traffic was so bad. I live maybe three miles from the Garden. It took me over 45 minutes to get here. I tried to take Storrow (Drive) because the navigation says it's the shortest way. At one point I really thought it would have been quicker to walk."

Kris Joseph  
"I've began to wonder who's worse, New York City drivers or these drivers. They don't let you know when you're trying to switch lanes or anything. They just do it. I'm cool getting places because I stay with the GPS. I don't care if it's the long way or the short way. It's going to get me there. To be honest, I've done more driving in the United States than I have in Canada, period (Joseph grew up in Montreal before attending Syracuse University). There's a lot of public transportation there. But a daily commute is cool because I stay ten minutes away from the practice facility so it's not too, too far. Here, you've just got to leave early to beat that traffic, so it's cool. I've been doing alright."  

Butler imitates Brown with post-interception dance: 'Nothing personal'


Butler imitates Brown with post-interception dance: 'Nothing personal'

Malcolm Butler didn't mean any disrespect. After all, imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. 


When the Patriots corner picked off a Landry Jones pass in the first quarter -- one that was intended for receiver Antonio Brown -- Butler stood up in the end zone, faced the Heinz Field crowd, stuck one arm in the air But and gyrated like someone had attached jumper cables to his facemask. 

He was doing his best to mimick one of Brown's well-known touchdown dances.

"Me and Brown had conversation before," Butler said, "and it was a joke to him once I showed him how I do it. Much love for that guy. Nothing personal."

For Butler, it was the highlight of what was a productive afternoon. The third-year corner was asked to shadow Brown for much of the day, and he held Brown to five catches on nine targets for 94 yards. He also broke up a pair of passes intended for Brown's teammates.

“Stopping Antonio Brown, that’s impossible," Butler said. "You can’t stop him. You can only slow him down. I just went out there and tried to compete today . . . Great players are going to make plays but you have to match their intensity.”
Even on the longest throw from backup quarterback Landry Jones to Brown, a 51-yarder, it appeared as though Butler played the coverage called correctly. 

Butler lined up across from Brown and trailed him underneath as Brown worked his way from the left side of the field to the right. Butler was looking for some help over the top in that scenario, seemingly, but because Brown ran across the formation, it was hard for the back end of the defense to figure out who would be helping Butler. 

Coach Bill Belichick admitted as much after the game. 

"He was on [Brown] a lot the way we set it up," Belichick said. "Look, they've got great players. They're tough to cover. They hit us on a couple over routes, in cut where they kind of ran away from the coverage that we had. 

"The plays were well designed. Good scheme, good thorws and obviously good routes by Brown. They got us on a couple, but I thought we competed hard. We battled all the way. We battled on third down. We battled in the red area. They made some. We made some, but they're good. They have a lot of good players."

And Brown, in particular, is about as close as it gets to unstoppable in the NFL. Butler found that out in Week 1 of last year when he matched up with Brown in his first game as a starter, giving up 9 catches for 133 yards to the All-Pro wideout. 

Though Sunday might not have been perfect for Butler, it was better than that day about 14 months ago. And at times, it was worth dancing about. 

SUNDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL: Seahawks, Cardinals miss OT FGs, tie 6-6


SUNDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL: Seahawks, Cardinals miss OT FGs, tie 6-6

GLENDALE, Ariz. (AP) Seattle's Stephen Hauschka and Arizona's Chandler Catanzaro missed short field goals that would have won the game in overtime and the Seahawks and Cardinals settled for a 6-6 tie Sunday night.

Hauschka's 27-yard field goal was wide left with seven seconds left after Catanzaro's 24-yarder bounced off the left upright.

The tie was the Cardinals' first since Dec. 7, 1986, a 10-10 draw at Philadelphia when the franchise was based in St. Louis. It was the first for the Seattle since entering the NFL in 1976.

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