Farrell one of five managers on 1988 Indians

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Farrell one of five managers on 1988 Indians

BOSTON John Farrell made his big league debut in 1987, an August call-up who appeared in 10 games, making nine starts, posting a record of 5-1 for the woeful Indians who went 61-101, finishing last in the seven-team American League East.

But, he came back the next year to pitch a full big league season, appearing in 31 games (30 starts), going 14-10. The Indians, though, were only marginally better, going 78-84, finishing sixth. Only the Orioles and their historically inept 0-21 start kept the Indians from last place in the AL East.

But, the impact of the 88 Indians would reverberate years later. Farrell pitched on a roster that would produce four other current major league managers: San Diegos Bud Black, Texas Ron Washington, Terry Francona, who is back with the Indians, and Philadelphias Charlie Manuel, who was the teams hitting coach then.

It was a unique time that so many guys were together, Farrell said. And our conversations were always not only about the game today but how would guys careers look like after playing. I think everybody wanted to stay in the game. I dont think you could say in 1988 I want to be a manager this year. We dont take that approach.

You dont sit there and map out your future. You're consumed by what you do today and if that creates opportunities for going forward, all the better. So that being said, thats where Tito and I first forged a relationship as teammates, as we did with other guys.

Farrell said he will draw on the influence of many people who have impacted his career, from his first professional season, to his time in player development, to his tenure with the Sox. He points to one of his first minor league managers as impacting his managerial approach.

Doc Edwards managed the Triple-A Maine Guides when Farrell made five starts for them in his first professional season. Edwards went on to manage the Indians when Farrell made his big league debut.

"He made me feel comfortable as a young pitcher, someone who was in somewhat awe of the big league environment and he put that at ease and that was important for a young player, Farrell said. I remember those conversations with him, his ability to just put his arm around you and make you feel like, hey, you know what, its going to be OK. And I've taken that approach with young players that I've had over the last two years.

There's no doubt standing next to Tito for four years here. Im the person I am today as far as a manager by the people I played for or worked with.

Farrell also pointed to Karl Kuehl, the long-time baseball veteran manager, scout, coach, player development specialist before his death in 2008 as someone who influenced his approach to young players.

Kuehl was a very influential person in the game in development who had a profound impact on me in dealing with players and dealing with how to develop players in just an old traditional approach that really has stood the test of time, Farrell said.

It all contributes to the torch that he hopes to pass on.

Theres a part of a number of people inside of me, he said. And, hopefully, Ill be able to impart some of that in the guys Ill be working with day in and day out.

Thomas: 'If you don't want to play for Celtics, you don't know basketball'

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Thomas: 'If you don't want to play for Celtics, you don't know basketball'

The Celtics season came to an end Thursday night as the Hawks took the first-round series in six games.

That stung everybody on the Celtics pretty hard in the moments after the final buzzer. But nobody appeared more upset than Isaiah Thomas, who made it clear that he poured his heart and soul into this season.

The goal now? To get better from within . . . and from the outside. That means bringing in some star talent.

Thomas spoke with reporters Friday after his end-of-season meeting with Celtics President Danny Ainge. He told them that everybody, especially Ainge, can see that the team needs a little more talent.

Acquiring it isn't easy, but having spent a season-and-a-half in Boston, Thomas doesn't see why someone wouldn't want to play for the Celtics.

There's no beating around the bush: Kevin Durant is the prized target this offseason. The Celtics appear to at least be somewhat in the picture. You can bet Thomas will do what he can to help.

The Celtics have an energetic fan base, a young team, and a load of assets. One of those assets will be determined at the lottery. And guess who will be there?

Will free agent Zeller be back with Celtics? ‘We’ll see what happens’

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Will free agent Zeller be back with Celtics? ‘We’ll see what happens’

WALTHAM, Mass. – Tyler Zeller has been in the NBA long enough for teams to have a feel for what he can do on the floor.
 
He runs the floor. He scores in transition. He’s not a banger, but isn’t afraid to mix it up inside.
 
All those qualities will be on display next season.
 
But will he be doing them for the Celtics?
 
As a restricted free agent, Zeller has no idea what lies ahead for him in the NBA.
 
While he plans to keep an open mind about the free agent process, Zeller made it clear in his exit interview on Friday that he would not have a problem returning to the Celtics next season.
 
“It’s a great organization, a great place to be,” Zeller said. “So we’ll see what happens.”
 
Zeller, who came to the Celtics via trade in the summer of 2014 from Cleveland, has had a roller coaster of a time in Boston.
 
He has been in every conceivable positon with the team, from starter to key rotation player to reserve to an end-of-the-bench player.
 
And through it all, Zeller was able to not allow his up-and-down status affect his ability to stay ready when his number was called.
 
Boston’s 104-92 Game 6 loss to Atlanta was one of the many examples of Zeller being prepared to play when his opportunity presented itself.
 
In Game 6, the 7-foot center came off the bench and scored eight points to go along with five rebounds in just less than 12 minutes of court time.
 
As far as whether the Celtics want him back, Zeller said, “I would hope so. You always hope a team wants you back. I would think they would. But at the same time, when July comes around, we’ll really see. When those negotiations start. Until then, you can say whatever you want. Until then, we’ll see what happens.”

Olynyk hasn’t decided if he’ll have shoulder surgery

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Olynyk hasn’t decided if he’ll have shoulder surgery

WALTHAM, Mass. – Kelly Olynyk will consult with additional doctors before deciding whether to have offseason surgery on his right shoulder.
 
The injury kept him out for 12 games in the regular season and he re-aggravated it in Boston’s first-round playoff series against the Atlanta Hawks.
 
“I felt like it was improving,” Olynyk said following his exit interview on Friday. “I had games where it would feel good, games it wouldn’t. It would get hit every game and kind of pinch, set you back. It was tough. It never felt 100 percent the whole time; it never felt 80. It’s tough going down that stretch of games. You want to be at your best when your best is needed.”
 
In the regular season, Olynyk averaged 10 points per game along with 4.1 rebounds while shooting 40.5 percent on 3s.
 
But in the six game series against the Hawks (he missed two games with the shoulder injury), the 7-foot center only scored just two points on 1-for-9 shooting.
 
As for surgery, Olynyk – like most of us – would much rather not have surgery if possible.
 
“It’s always an option when you have an injury of certain degrees,” Olynyk said. “If you can make sure it’s healthy without it, then it’s healthy without it.”
 
Depending on whether he has surgery will potentially impact his availability for the start of next season.
 
Regardless, Olynyk will do what he always does in the offseason — focus on ways to get better.
 
As he addressed the media, he had papers in his hand that included his stats from this season as well as other information pertinent to his offseason.
 
“Stuff to improve” was how Olynyk described the papers.
 
And as he began to elaborate, he grinned, “stuff mostly to improve.”
 
Like a cleaner bill of health, something that would bode well for both Olynyk and the Celtics.