DiSarcina eager for new role with Red Sox


DiSarcina eager for new role with Red Sox

PAWTUCKET, R.I. Saying he might need to brush off the cobwebs, Gary DiSarcina is resuming his managerial career, taking over the helm of Triple-A Pawtucket, after being out of the dugout and out of the Red Sox organization for the past two seasons.

DiSarcina, who was introduced Friday afternoon during a press conference at McCoy Stadium, had been with the Angels the past two seasons, after being in the Sox organization the previous five years.

He joined the Sox in November 2006, when he was named a baseball operations consultant, From 2007-09 he managed Low-A Lowell, where he compiled a record of 125-99 and led the Spinners to Stedler Division titles in 2008 and 2009. In 2010 he was the Sox minor league infield coordinator. He was also on the coaching staff for Team Italy for the 2006 World Baseball Classic.

In November 2010, DiSarcina left the Sox to join the Angels, the team for which he played his entire 12-season big league career. He was the Angels minor-league field coordinator last season before being named special assistant to the general manager in October, a position he also held in 2011.

Were obviously very familiar with Gary from his past experience with us, said Ben Crockett, Sox director of player development. He brings a wealth of knowledge from a long playing career. He served as an excellent manager and coordinator for us. He went on to some bigger experience with the Angels, working with the big league club as well as overseeing the farm system. So I think he comes back to us with a lot of experience thats going to serve this Pawtucket club well. Were really excited to have Gary back in the system.

General manager Ben Cherington said the organization was looking for a way to get DiSarcina back since he left. The Sox met with DiSarcina about the job during the winter meetings in Nashville last week.

Hes a guy we have a lot of respect for, Cherington said. It was hard for him because I think hes got loyalty to both organizations. He was a player in the Angels organization. Hes got loyalty to that organization. I think hes loyal to the Red Sox, too, because this is where he started his post-playing career, and obviously a guy thats from around here.

I think we were looking for someone to go to Triple-A who understood our core philosophy, understood what its like to be in Boston, to play in Boston, what preparing players to play in Boston is all about, someone we trusted and someone weve worked with in the past. So, we looked at a number of candidates but we felt like if we could get him back, he would be the right guy. And were fortunate that we could do that.

After filling in for the Angels Double-A manager for four games this season, he realized he wanted to eventually get back into the dugout. But, he said, he wouldnt have left the Angels for any other organization besides the Sox. The Billerica native, who now lives on the South Shore, has two kids, the youngest a freshman in high school.

While he is familiar with the organization from his previous tenure, he knows his new job will have its specific challenges, along with those a manager at any level faces.

Probably just knocking the cobwebs off a little bit. I think spring training will be great for that, he said. A big adjustment will be talking to the front office more. Talking to Sox manager John Farrell and bench coach Torey Lovullo when they call down more, just getting a little more adjusted to talking to the front office people, because when youre in Lowell your days are pretty much set out, you know who youre pitching, you know how its going, you dont talk to the front office as much at that lower level. Just to be more interactive with those guys.

DiSarcina, 45, ended his playing career in 2002 appearing in 35 games with the PawSox.

DiSarcina is replacing Arnie Beyeler who was promoted to first base coach for the major league team. DiSarcina cited Beyeler for helping him when he began managing in Lowell.

Arnie helped me out tremendously when I first went up to manage Lowell, DiSarcina said. I basically went up to Portland where Beyeler was managing the Double-A team at the time and shadowed him for four or five days. He was a tremendous help.

DiSarcina, who said he ultimately would like to manage at the big league level, learned a major lesson from his time in Lowell.

That I could do it. That was probably the most important thing that I learned, that first day I managed my first game I was nervous as hell, I walked in the dugout and I was nervous, the nerves went away right after that first pitch was gone. I dont care how many years you played in the big leagues, how many years you played in the minor leagues that first managing gig youre nervous. The game speeds up on you really quick. It took me a week or two just to settle down and get into a routine. But just that I could do it.

Five quick impressions: Patriots 27, Steelers 16

Five quick impressions: Patriots 27, Steelers 16

The Patriots went into Pittsburgh and beat an under-manned Steelers team Sunday afternoon, 27-16. Here are some of our quick takeaways.

PATRIOTS 27, STEELERS 16: Curran's Best and Worst | Troy Brown: Pittsburgh didn't capitalize on Pats' mistakes

-- With all eyes on the matchup between Antonio Brown and Malcolm Butler, the third-year Patriots corner held his own. After allowing nine catches for 133 yards to Brown in their first meeting last season, Butler allowed Brown to catch five passes for 90 yards Sunday. Butler also took advantage of some of the chances taken by Landry Jones, intercepting one pass intended for Brown in the end zone in the first quarter. Butler finished the day with two pass breakups and a pick on 10 targets. The four catches he allowed to Brown were the only catches he allowed in the game. 

-- Julian Edelman looked like Julian Edelman in the win. He caught 9 of the 10 targets sent his way for 60 yards, getting open underneath while seeing one-on-one coverage for much of the contest. Edelman has been on the injury report for the last two weeks, limited with a foot injury, but he was able to get open on the intermediate routes that has made him one of Tom Brady's favorite targets over the last few years. Edelman did have one drop on third down, and he did fumble a punt return, which allows us to . . . 

-- . . . take a look at what was a rough day for Patriots special teams units. Kicker Stephen Gostkowski missed yet another extra point -- his second in as many weeks. He has now missed five kicks on the season, including three field goals. The Patriots kickoff unit also had a difficult day, allowing three kicks to be returned past the 25-yard line. The punt-coverage team made one costly error at the end of the first half when Brandon Bolden kicked a bouncing ball out of the back of the Steelers end zone. Instead of the Pittsburgh drive starting at the 6-yard line, where Bolden touched the football, it came out to the 20. At the end of the half, the Steelers kicked a 32-yard field goal. Bolden also dropped a third-down pass that would have gone for a first down. On another punt, it appeared as though Bolden got up slowly after trying to down the ball near the goal line. It was his first game back after suffering a knee injury in Week 4.

-- LeGarrette Blount had a big day against his former team. The 250-pound back didn't want to be a story line earlier in the week, denying interview requests, saying that he would speak after the game on Sunday. His performance at Heinz Field will certainly keep those requests coming. He ran 24 times for 127 yards and two touchdowns, beating up on the Steelers front-seven late in the game as New England protected its lead. 

-- While the Patriots offensive line provided Blount with enough room to run, it was a relatively sloppy day for Brady's protection up front. Left tackle Nate Solder turned in one drive during which he allowed a pressure and was then flagged for back-to-back holding penalties (one of which was declined). Shaq Mason also appeared to have trouble with Pittsburgh's Jarvis Jones, allowing a couple of pressures and picking up a flag for holding. Joe Thuney and David Andrews -- both of whom had good blocks on James White's score -- also picked up penalties. There will be plenty for offensive line coach Dante Scarnecchia to pick at and try to improve in the coming week of practice.