Curt Schilling may have to sell his bloody sock

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Curt Schilling may have to sell his bloody sock

From Comcast SportsNetPROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) -- Former Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling might have to sell or give up the famed blood-stained sock he wore on the team's way to the 2004 World Series championship to cover millions of dollars in loans he guaranteed to his failed video game company.Schilling, whose Providence-based 38 Studios filed for bankruptcy in June, listed the sock as collateral to Bank Rhode Island in a September filing with the Massachusetts secretary of state's office. The sock is on display at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, N.Y.Schilling also listed a baseball hat believed to have been worn by New York Yankees great Lou Gehrig and his collection of World War II memorabilia, including some the filing said is being held at the National World War II Museum.Schilling told WEEI-AM in Boston on Thursday that possibly having to sell the sock is part of "having to pay for your mistakes." He said that "I put myself out there" in personally guaranteeing loans to 38 Studios and is seeking what he called an amicable solution with the bank."I'm obligated to try and make amends and, unfortunately, this is one of the byproducts of that," he told the station.Hall of Fame spokesman Brad Horn declined to say whether Schilling has asked for the sock, on loan since 2005, to be returned.The Boston Globe first reported the filing Thursday. It said Schilling personally guaranteed as much as 9.6 million in loans from Bank Rhode Island and 2.4 million in loans from Citizens Bank related to 38 Studios.Schilling, who also pitched for Baltimore, Houston, Philadelphia and Arizona and who won the World Series three times, is perhaps best remembered for pitching Game 6 of the 2004 American League Championship Series with an injured ankle that bloodied his sock. The sock now listed as collateral was stained during the second game of the World Series, which the Red Sox won that year for the first time in 86 years.Richie Russek, owner of the Westhampton, N.Y.-based Grey Flannel Auctions, who is featured on The Discovery Channel series "All Star Dealers," estimated the bloody sock could sell for 50,000 to 100,000, but stressed there is nothing comparable that has ever been auctioned off. He said the Gehrig cap would likely fetch at least 150,000.38 Studios -- which was lured to Rhode Island from Massachusetts with a 75 million state loan guarantee -- had a spectacular collapse. Its financial problems spilled into public view last spring when it missed a 1.1 million payment to the Economic Development Corp. Within weeks, 38 Studios had laid off its nearly 300 employees in Providence and 100 more at an affiliate in Maryland ahead of a bankruptcy filing in June.The firm owes 150.7 million and has assets of 21.7 million, according to court filings. 38 Studios Baltimore made a separate bankruptcy and owes more than 121.4 million, with assets of more than 335,000.The state of Rhode Island, by far the firm's largest creditor, is now likely on the hook for some 100 million related to the loan guarantee deal, including interest. The company's assets are scheduled to be auctioned off.Schilling has conceded he was "absolutely" part of the reason the company failed. But he repeatedly accused Gov. Lincoln Chafee, who was sharply critical of the loan guarantee, of having an agenda that hurt 38 Studios. He called Chafee a "dunce of epic proportions" and a "buffoon."Chafee, an independent, has said he did everything he could to help the company.Schilling also recently put his 20-room home on 26 acres in Medfield, Mass., on the market for 3.45 million. The house, which has a heated pool with waterfall, a beach volleyball court, batting and pitching cages and a putting green, was also listed for sale in 2008. He told WEEI on Thursday that he and his wife had been looking to downsize for some time.Schilling has said he invested as much as 50 million in 38 Studios and has lost all his baseball earnings.

Heinen looking to show his offense in his shot on Krejci line

Heinen looking to show his offense in his shot on Krejci line

BRIGHTON, Mass – The Bruins mixed things up with their roster a bit on Saturday after dropping a couple of games in a row to Washington and Colorado. 

Fourth-line energy winger Noel Acciari and playmaking forward Danton Heinen were called up from Providence and will be in the lineup against the Toronto Maple Leafs at TD Garden on Saturday night. 
Acciari went to Providence the past couple of days to get some game action in after missing the past month with a lower body injury, but clearly showed he’s ready to go. 

So, Acciari is back to provide the same hard-hitting and energy he showed before he was hurt and Heinen is looking to show off a little more offense than in his first stint with the Black and Gold this season. He’ll be featured in a top role as left wing with David Krejci and David Backes and with marching orders to shoot the puck like he never shot it in his previous stint in Boston. 

For the Bruins, it’s about getting another look at a candidate to play left wing beside Krejci with both Ryan Spooner and Tim Schaller, with limitations to their respective games, unable to fully grasp that same opportunity. 

“My hope is that Heinen can come in and give us some good hockey. He’s a skill player and he’s been down there for a while, and he’s back up again because he’s been playing well,” said Claude Julien of the Bruins rookie, who had four goals and seven points in his past five games with Providence. “Hopefully he can play well here also. It’s about getting some confidence. When he went down to [the AHL] the pace of his game had to get a little bit better, and in the battles coming up with the puck along the walls. Those are the kinds of things we thought he could work on down in Providence.”

Heinen knows he needs to shoot the puck a bit more to show off his offense after a seven-game stint with the Bruins where he went scoreless, was a minus-2 and had just six shots on net.

“Being hard on the walls, playing fast and shooting the puck, those were all things I was working on [in Providence],” said Heinen, who has seven goals and 13 points in 13 games for the P-Bruins after being assigned to Providence. “I was doing what they told me to do [in Providence] and that’s shoot the puck. They were going in, and I was getting some good opportunities on the power play. It’s seriously tough to get chances [at the NHL level], so you can’t pass them up when you have chances. That was kind of my focus down there.”

Fellow fourth-line energy winger Anton Blidh has been shipped to Providence after three solid games with the Black and Gold. 

Julien said Blidh goes back to Providence having adequately shown that he can play in the NHL. He clearly showed the Bruins that he understands his role as a player that stirs things up a bit and gets his nose dirty on a regular basis.

“[Blidh] was fine. No issues there. He does his job. He plays with lots of energy and obviously he’s getting more experience. He’s a lot better at understanding his positioning within the game and what he has to do,” said Julien. “I thought he helped us out for the time that he was here.”

With Heinen and Acciari both in the lineup and Blidh back in Providence, that means Jimmy Hayes will be scratched after dressing for three of the past four games for Boston.

PFT: Belichick can still diagram his dad’s Navy plays from 1959

PFT: Belichick can still diagram his dad’s Navy plays from 1959

CBS interviewed Patriots coach Bill Belichick and 1960 Heisman winner Joe Bellino from Navy as part of its Army-Navy Game coverage Saturday.

Belichick's father, Steve, was an assistant coach at Navy when Bellino played there, and little Bill, then 7, took it all in. So much so, that 57 years later, Belichick can still diagram the 27 F Trap play that his dad used to drew up in the 1959 season for Bellino.

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