Cowboys' wideout allegedly attacked his own mom

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Cowboys' wideout allegedly attacked his own mom

From Comcast SportsNet
DALLAS (AP) -- With training camp just two weeks away, Dallas Cowboys wide receiver Dez Bryant is in trouble again. The talented wide receiver was arrested Monday after being accused of attacking his mother during an argument, hitting her arms and face. He faces a charge of family violence, a misdemeanor punishable by up to a year in jail and a 4,000 fine. The Cowboys had no comment on the latest stumble by Bryant since the Cowboys drafted him out of Oklahoma State in 2010. Bryant had spent this offseason watching film, working on his conditioning and staying out of trouble off the field. Others noticed he was in better shape and more focused. The 23-year-old Bryant surrendered Monday after police in DeSoto, south of Dallas, issued a warrant. Police said Angela Bryant called 911 Saturday to complain her son was assaulting her. Police arrived to find her with a swollen wrist and thumb and bruising on her upper arms, police Capt. Ron Smith said. She told police she had grabbed Dez Bryant's shirt and he forcefully knocked her arms away, Smith said. Police say he hit her on the face with a ball cap and pushed her in the chest. Bryant was released a few hours later without talking to detectives, Smith said. His attorney, Royce West, said Bryant posted 1,500 bond. Smith declined to say Tuesday what caused the argument. "I don't know what the exact startup was, what caused everything," Smith said. "I just know that his mother got involved and got injured." Police plan to send their case later this week to Dallas prosecutors, Smith said. West said Tuesday that he was still investigating the circumstances of Saturday's incident. One of his primary goals, he said, was to "make certain that the family heals." "I know that Dez loves his mother," West said. "I know his mother loves him." West declined to say if Dez and Angela Bryant have spoken since Saturday or what may have caused their argument. Drafted by the Cowboys in the first round, Bryant entered the league having his last year of college nearly wiped out by an NCAA suspension for lying about having dinner with Deion Sanders. He ran up hundreds of thousands of dollars in bills on game tickets and jewelry -- and was sued by alleged creditors. Last year, he was kicked out of an upscale Dallas mall for wearing sagging pants. In January, he was reportedly involved in a fight with the rapper Lil Wayne at a Miami nightclub. "All of us have had some youthful indiscretions," West said, adding that he questioned the truth behind some of the allegations. "We learn from those indiscretions and we move forward." Bryant's potential has always been clear. A standout at Oklahoma State, Bryant caught 45 passes for 561 yards in 12 games in his rookie season. Last year, he had 63 catches for 928 yards and nine touchdowns. He had mostly stayed out of the news this offseason, besides tweeting that his body fat was down to 3.1 percent. Owner Jerry Jones said in June that he saw more maturity and focus in Bryant, and quarterback Tony Romo predicted he would get better every year if he worked at it. "I feel that I have learned a lot from all aspects, on the field, off the field," Bryant said then. "I see a lot of things more clear now, and I'm more confident in everything that I do. On the field and off the field, I try to make the best choices possible, and I feel like I'm doing a great job of that."

Colin Kaepernick will sit through anthem until there's change

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Colin Kaepernick will sit through anthem until there's change

SANTA CLARA, Calif. - Defiant, and determined to be a conduit for U.S. change, Colin Kaepernick plans to sit through the national anthem for as long as he feels is appropriate and until he sees significant progress in America - specifically when it comes to race relations.

He knows he could be cut by San Francisco for this stand. Criticized, ostracized, and he'll go it all alone if need be.

The quarterback realizes he might be treated poorly in some road cities, and he's ready for that, too, saying he's not overly concerned about his safety, but "if something happens that's only proving my point."

"I'm going to continue to stand with the people that are being oppressed," Kaepernick said Sunday at his locker. "To me this is something that has to change. When there's significant change and I feel like that flag represents what it's supposed to represent, this country is representing people the way that it's supposed to, I'll stand."

Two days after he refused to stand for the "The Star Spangled Banner" before the 49ers' preseason loss to the Packers, Kaepernick insists whatever the consequences, he will know "I did what's right." He said he hasn't heard from the NFL or anyone else about his actions - and it won't matter if he does.

"No one's tried to quiet me and, to be honest, it's not something I'm going to be quiet about," he said. "I'm going to speak the truth when I'm asked about it. This isn't for look. This isn't for publicity or anything like that. This is for people that don't have the voice. And this is for people that are being oppressed and need to have equal opportunities to be successful. To provide for families and not live in poor circumstances."

Letting his hair go au natural and sprinting between drills as usual, Kaepernick took the field Sunday with the 49ers as his stance drew chatter across NFL camps.

He explained his viewpoints to teammates in the morning, some agreeing with his message but not necessarily his method. Some said they know he has offended his countrymen, others didn't even know what he had done.

"Every guy on this team is entitled to their opinion. We're all grown men," linebacker NaVorro Bowman said.

"I agree with what he did, but not in the way he did it," wideout Torrey Smith said. "That's not for me. He has that right. Soldiers have died for his right to do exactly what he did. ... I know he's taken a lot of heat for it. He understands that when you do something like that it does offend a lot of people."

Both Bowman and Smith are African American.

Kaepernick criticized presidential candidates Donald Trump ("openly racist") and Hillary Clinton;" called out police brutality against minorities; and pushed for accountability of public officials.

"You can become a cop in six months and don't have to have the same amount of training as a cosmetologist," Kaepernick said. "That's insane. Someone that's holding a curling iron has more education and more training than people that have a gun and are going out on the street to protect us."

In college at Nevada, Kaepernick said, police were called one day "because we were the only black people in that neighborhood." Officers entered without knocking and drew guns on him and his teammates and roommates as they were moving their belongings, he said.

He said his stand is not against men and women in the military fighting and losing their lives for Americans' rights and freedoms.

Kaepernick, whose hair had been in cornrows during training camp, sat on the bench during Friday's national anthem at Levi's Stadium. Giants wideout Victor Cruz and Bills coach Rex Ryan said standing for the anthem shows respect.

"There's a lot of things that need to change. One specifically? Police brutality," said Kaepernick, whose adoptive parents are Caucasian. "There's people being murdered unjustly and not being held accountable. People are being given paid leave for killing people. That's not right. That's not right by anyone's standards."

On Sunday, he stopped briefly on a side field to talk with Dr. Harry Edwards and they shared a quick embrace before the quarterback grabbed his helmet and took the field. Edwards is a sociologist and African-American activist who helped plan the "Olympic Project for Human Rights" before the 1968 Mexico City Olympics, where U.S. sprinters and medalists Tommie Smith and John Carlos bowed their heads through the anthem on the medal podium in their black power protest.

After swirling trade talks all offseason following Kaepernick's three surgeries and sub-par 2015 season, he has done everything so far but play good football - and he doesn't plan for this to be a distraction.

Coach Chip Kelly did not speak to the media Sunday. He said Saturday he still hasn't decided on his starting quarterback in a competition between Kaepernick and Blaine Gabbert, who took over the job from Kaepernick last November and has vowed to be the No. 1 again.

Kaepernick hasn't stood for the anthem in any of the team's three preseason games "and I don't see it as going about it the wrong way."

"That's his right as a citizen," Kelly said. "We recognize his right as an individual to choose to participate or not participate in the national anthem."

Now, Kaepernick is prepared for whatever comes next.

"I think there's a lot of consequences that come along with this. There's a lot of people that don't want to have this conversation," he said. "They're scared they might lose their job. Or they might not get the endorsements. They might not to be treated the same way. Those are things I'm prepared to handle. ...

"At this point, I've been blessed to be able to get this far and have the privilege of being able to be in the NFL, making the kind of money I make and enjoy luxuries like that. I can't look in the mirror and see people dying on the street that should have the same opportunities that I've had."