Celtics get aggressive on glass in win over Wolves

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Celtics get aggressive on glass in win over Wolves

BOSTON The final score highlighted 104 points, an impressive performance with 52.6 percent field goal shooting.

Beyond the offensive stats against the Minnesota Timberwolves on Wednesday, the Boston Celtics prided themselves on an even more noteworthy effort on the boards.

We were pretty good, said Doc Rivers after the Celtics 104-94 win. Thats a hard team to rebound against, and we held our own.

The Celtics ranked last in the NBA with 37.8 rebounds per game while allowing 42.0. The Timberwolves, on the other hand, held the fifth spot with 45.2 boards, led by Kevin Love with 14.4 per game.

By the end of the game, the Celtics had outrebounded the Timberwolves, 45-41. Kevin Garnett drove the team with 10 boards while power forwards Brandon Bass and Jared Sullinger contributed eight and seven, respectively.

We have to be that way every night, said Paul Pierce. Were challenged rebound-wise and a majority of these games we havent rebounded well. So thats mainly what the last couple days of practice have been is to put bodies on people, go after rebounds, box out, those little things that are going to help us win games.

The Celtics will look to continue improving their rebounding efforts in back-to-back games against the Philadelphia 76ers on Friday and Saturday. The Celtics are 0-1 against the Sixers this season (0-2 in preseason action) and were outrebounded 38-31 in their first meeting on November 9. 6-7 Evan Turner led all players with 11 boards, one more than Garnett.

Id like to beat them both times but theyre playing well against us and were going to have to deal with that., said Rivers. They must have great confidence against us, so those are going to be hard games. I do like it, especially in this stretch. Coming into it I think were starting to play a little bit better. Weve struggled playing Philly so I love all that stuff because thats good, the way I look at it in my demented way. I think those are all good things.I think its a good challenge for us, so itll be a lot of fun.

Three things we learned from the Red Sox’ 11-9 loss to the Twins

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Three things we learned from the Red Sox’ 11-9 loss to the Twins

Three things we learned from the Boston Red Sox’ 11-9 loss to the Minnesota Twins . . .

1) David Price isn’t having fun

Boston’s $217 million-dollar arm had another rough outing -- this time against a team that already has 60 losses.

Those are the team’s he’s supposed to dominate.

“It’s been terrible,” Price said on how his season has gone following the loss. “Just awful.”

Price’s mistakes have often been credited to mechanical mishaps this year. Farrell mentioned that following his start in New York, Price spent time working on getting more of a downhill trajectory on his pitches.

But Price doesn’t think his issue is physical.

So it must be mental -- but he doesn’t feel that’s the case either.

“Honestly I don’t think it’s either one of those,” Price said when asked which he thought was a factor. “It’s me going out there and making pitches. “

But when it comes down to the barebones, pitching -- much like anything else -- is a physical and mental act.

So when he says it’s neither, that’s almost impossible. It could be both, but it has to be one.

His mind could be racing out on the mound from a manifestation of the issues he’s had throughout the season.

Or it could just be that his fastball isn’t changing planes consistently, like Farrell mentioned.

Both could be possible too, but it takes a certain type of physical approach and mental approach to pitch -- and Price needs to figure out which one is the issue, or how to address both. 

2) Sandy Leon might be coming back to Earth

Over his last five games, Boston’s new leading catcher is hitting .176 (3-for-17), dropping his average to .395.

A couple things have to be understood. His average is still impressive. In the five games prior to this dry spell, Leon went 7-for-19 (.368) But -- much like Jackie Bradley Jr. -- Leon hasn’t been known for his offensive output throughout his career. So dry spells are always tests of how he can respond to adversity and make necessary adjustments quickly.

Furthermore, if he’s not so much falling into a funk as opposed to becoming the real Sandy Leon -- what is Boston getting?

Is his run going to be remembered as an exciting run that lasted much longer than anyone expected? Or if he going to show he’s a legitimate hitter that can hit at least -.260 to .280 with a little pop from the bottom of the line-up?

What’s more, if he turns back into the Sandy Leon he’s been throughout his career, the Red Sox will have an interesting dilemma on how to handle the catching situation once again.

3) Heath Hembree has lost the momentum he gained after being called up.

Following Saturday’s contest, the right-hander was demoted to Triple-A Pawtucket after an outing where he went 1/3 of an inning, giving up a run on three hits -- and allowing some inherited runners to score.

Hembree at one point was the savior of the bullpen, stretching his arm out over three innings at a time to bail out the scuffling Red Sox starting rotation that abused it’s bullpen.

His ERA is still only 2.41 -- and this has been the most he’s ever pitched that big league level -- but the Red Sox have seen a change in him since the All-Star break.

Which makes sense, given that hitters have seven hits and two walks against him in his 1.1 innings of work -- spanning four games since the break.

“He’s not confident pitcher right now,” John Farrell said about Hembree before announcing his demotion. “As good as Heath has been for the vast majority of this year -- and really in the whole first half -- the four times out since the break have been the other side of that.”

Joe Kelly will be the pitcher to replace Hembree and Farrell hopes to be able to stretch him out over multiple innings at a time, as well.