Celtics-Bucks review: More missed opportunities for C's

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Celtics-Bucks review: More missed opportunities for C's

BOSTON The Boston Celtics had spurts of good play, but not enough to win on Friday against Milwaukee.

Sounds familiar?

It should.

That has been the essence of what this season has been like for the Celtics as they lost yet another winnable game, 99-94, in overtime.

Even though Boston spent the bulk of the first half with a lead, Celtics coach Doc Rivers didn't feel good about his team clinging to a three-point lead at the half.

"I was concerned because I thought we should've been up 15 points," Rivers said.

It was more of the same in the second half as the Celtics continued to miss one good-looking jumper after another.

"It was a frustrating game," Rivers said.

For fans, the coaches but especially the players.

"One thing we can control, I think, is our intensity on the defensive end; we are inconsistent," said Paul Pierce. "We can't give up 17-0 runs to Cleveland. We can't give up 10-0 runs to Milwaukee. And then decide that's when we want to play defense."

Indeed, inconsistent play was among the factors that snapped the Celtics' five-game home winning streak on Friday. Here are some other keys identified prior to the game, and how they played out.

WHAT TO LOOK FOR: Paul Pierce carried the C's to a season-high 40 points on Wednesday. No one should expect another night like that from the Captain, but he really does have to deliver 20 or so points consistently for this team to win.

WHAT WE SAW: Pierce continues to be the one player who is doing more than just talking about playing better - he's actually doing it. The Captain could not have given the C's more than he did on Friday, tallying a game-high 35 points along with 12 rebounds, five assists and three steals. Rivers had no choice but to go to Pierce often."When everybody's not making shots you're down, you're looking for whoever is making shots," Rivers said. "And I thought Paul had to work way too hard for his shots."

MATCHUP TO WATCH: Kevin Garnett vs Larry Sanders: Now that Garnett is back to playing the power forward spot full-time, we'll see if that helps him do a better job on Sanders who has emerged as one of the league's most improved players this season. This season, Sanders is averaging 12.7 points and 11.7 rebounds against the Celtics.

WHAT WE SAW: This matchup was clearly won by Sanders who finished with 17 points, 20 rebounds, three assists and a pair of blocked shots. Among his most important plays was blocking a Paul Pierce 3-point shot that would have tied the game in overtime, and hustling down court to finish off the play with an uncontested dunk. "He's definitely growing as a player," said Bucks coach Scott Skiles. "There's no doubt about that."

PLAYER TO WATCH: Jeff Green has been in a bit of an offensive lull lately, but the Bucks just might be what he needs to snap out of it. Some of Green's best play this season has come against Milwaukee, a team that he averages 13.7 points per game against this season while shooting 57.1 percent from the field.

WHAT WE SAW: True to form, Green had a much better showing against the Bucks then he had in some of the C's more recent games. He came off the bench to score 14 points on 4-for-9 shooting before leaving the game in the fourth quarter after suffering a bruised left cheek injury and some chipped teeth when he was hit with an elbow from Milwaukee's Ersan Ilyasova.

STAT TO TRACK: A solid night defensively by the Celtics should lead to plenty of fast-break opportunities against a Milwaukee team that has had issues with their transition defense. The Bucks give up 16.3 points on fast breaks per game this season which ranks last in the NBA. That should help the C's improve upon their 13.5 fast break points per game average which ranks 16th in the league.

WHAT WE SAW: The C's had a good pace as far as equalling or surpassing the fast-break points allowed by the Bucks. At the half, Boston had eight fast-break points and finished with 14 for the night.

Quotes, notes and stars: Ramirez knows error 'can't happen'

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Quotes, notes and stars: Ramirez knows error 'can't happen'

Quotes, notes and stars from the Red Sox' 2-1 loss to the Los Angeles Angels ofAnaheim

Quotes:

"I tried to get two (outs) before I got one. That can't happen." - Hanley Ramirez on his throwing error which cost the Red Sox the game.

"Executing pitches - that's the name of the game." - David Price on improvement he showed from his last start.

"Fourth time through the order, middle of the lineup. . . Price had done his job. In a one-run game, we felt it was best to start a clean inning with a reliever." - John Farrell after lifting David Price after eight innings and 108 pitches.

Notes:

* Reliever Brad Ziegler was charged with the loss for the second straight game.

* Each of the last seven Red Sox losses has been by one or two runs.

* Dustin Pedroia has reached base in 31 consecutive games.

* The Red Sox four-game losing streak is their longest of the season.

* The Sox are now 9-23 in their last 32 meetings with the Angels.

* David Price did not allow a run for the second time this season.

Stars:

1) David Price

After a stretch of shaky outings, Price did his job with eight scoreless innings, getting 14 outs on groundouts while walking just one.

2) Jered Weaver

At times, the radar gun made Weaver's pitches look like softball offerings. But mixing junk, he held the Sox to a single run over 5 1/3 innings

3) Mookie Betts

He had just one hit - single in the eighth - but his sacrifice fly in the third produced the only run of the night.

First impressions: Ziegler can't finish Price's strong start

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First impressions: Ziegler can't finish Price's strong start

First impressions from the Red Sox' 2-1 loss to the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim

1) David Price pitched in the truest sense

Price wasn't necessarily overpowering with only six strikeouts in eight innings, but he succeeded in keeping the ball down in the zone, resulting in a ton of groundouts.

In eight innings, the Angels produced just two flouts to the outfield, both of them routine.

Otherwise, Price deftly mixed his changeup, slider and two-seamer to produce ground balls. His location was more precise and he induced weak contact in at-bat after at-bat.

 

2) The danger of a closer like Brad Ziegler was on display

The throwing error by Hanley Ramirez resulted in two runs scoring but Ziegler allowed three base hits to set the stage.

Ziegler doesn't get a lot of swing-and-miss with his sinker; what he gets is a lot of balls put in play. When things are going well, that results in groundouts; when they're not, it means baserunners and strange things happening.

As inconsistent as Craig Kimbrel has been in some non-save situations, he at least has the ability to record strikeouts and keep balls out of play.  That's not the case with Zieger, as the Red Sox learned the hard way in Anaheim Thursday night.

3) The Red Sox wisely took advantage of Jered Weaver on the bases

Weaver's high leg kick and reliance on off-speed pitches make for a slow delivery time to the plate. Dustin Pedroia would have easily stole second in the first but made the mistake of going into his slide too far ahead of the bag, and though initially ruled safe, was deemed out after a replay challenge.

In the sixth, Xander Bogaerts, was more successful in his stolen base. Neither steal led to a run, but the Sox did put some additional pressure on Weaver