Celtics' Bass gets his yoga on

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Celtics' Bass gets his yoga on

Brandon Bass isnt afraid of breaking a sweat in the yoga studio.

The Boston Celtics power forward has been taking bikram yoga classes for the past three years. His nutritionist recommended the exercise, in which a room is heated to over 100 degrees, while he was playing for the Orlando Magic.

Bass he has stuck with it since joining the Celtics. He credited yoga for helping him to bounce back from knee injuries last season.

I go twice a week for 90 minutes, he told CSNNE.com. I find that its good for lengthening, strengthening, and balance. My nutritionist got me into it. I thought he was crazy because it was hard very hard my first time. But its a mental thing so I just got used to it and now its easy.

Now in his eighth NBA season, the 27-year-old is mindful of how he takes care of his body, which includes carefully selecting the foods he consumes. Bass pregame meals consist of either sweet potatoes or pasta The best slow-burning carbs, he explained and he also drinks fruit or vegetable blend drinks.

Some of the vegetable drinks I dont like, but I get used to it, he said. Its a lifestyle for me. I dont really eat for taste anymore. When youre eating healthy, you cant possibly be eating for taste.

Bass entered this season weighing 250 pounds, down from 265 in last years training camp. A Louisiana native, he has to resist temptation when he returns in the offseason.

Its absolutely hard because when I go back home I have family that wants to cook for me, soul food, he said. I cheat my diet sometimes red beans and rice, cornbread, red velvet cake, pound cake sometimes. I didnt splurge much though.

Bass dedication to staying fit and agile on the court is paying off. He is averaging 9.9 points and 5.7 rebounds in 29.7 minutes this season. Bass ranks third on the Celtics in total rebounds (51) and leads the squad in offensive boards (18 of the teams total 61).

Celtics aren't asking Al Horford to be 'anything more' than what he is

Celtics aren't asking Al Horford to be 'anything more' than what he is

WALTHAM -- From one media station to the next, Al Horford effortlessly moved about during Boston Celtics Media Day.
 
In between stations, I jokingly asked the nine-year veteran, "Been through a few of these before?"
 
"A couple," he quipped.
 
But Monday was different. And every other Monday going forward this season will be different, too, for the longtime Atlanta Hawks forward, who is now a member of the Boston Celtics after they signed him to a four-year, $113 million contract this summer.
 
With that significant increase in salary comes -- from those outside the Celtics program at least -- a higher level of expectations.
 
"We’re not asking Al to be anything more than him," said coach Brad Stevens.  "He’s a good fit for how we play on offense. He’s a good fit for how we play on defense. He’s a professional. He has a routine. He works hard at his craft. He’s a guy that guys can follow by example."
 
However, Horford joins a Celtics team that -- since the rebuild began in 2013 -- has yet to win 50 games in a single season or get past the first round of the playoffs.
 
And while it will certainly be a collective team effort for Boston to achieve those goals, make no mistake about it: Horford is expected to be the man leading the way.
 
"We need to start building good habits from Day One," Horford said.

Danny Ainge, Boston’s president of basketball operations, is a big fan of Horford’s character and versatility, which has been on display throughout his career.
 
"As much as anything he’s been very consistent over his career," Ainge said. "Shooting the ball, playing multiple positions. He’s a guy that fits in with our system with big guys handling the ball a lot."
 
Horford’s new teammate echoed similar sentiments about the four-time All-Star.
 
And when you listen to his new Celtics teammates talk about him and what he’ll bring to a roster that’s loaded with returnees, there are a couple of common themes that seem to develop.
 
"He brings leadership; hard work," said Avery Bradley.
 
Bradley had a chance to spend some time around Jeff Teague, one of Horford’s former teammates in Atlanta.
 
"He just told me I’m really going to enjoy having him on this team," Bradley said. "He’s going to open the floor for everybody. He’s a great player on the offensive end, defensive end. He knows how to play the game of basketball. To have him be a part of this team, I’m just happy about it."
 
So is Amir Johnson, who will likely start with Horford in the frontcourt for Boston.
 
Last season, Johnson was Boston’s primary rim-protecting big man. With the addition of Horford, Johnson won’t be relied on as heavily to be Boston’s last line of defense, which makes his life easier and, more importantly, makes the Celtics a better team defensively.
 
"[Horford] has so many skills he can contribute to the game," Johnson said. "He can run the floor, block shots, shoot the 3-ball, which is big now. He can do it all. It’ll be a big piece to carry us over the top. We just have to put it all together."