Cell phones will now be part of baseball games

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Cell phones will now be part of baseball games

From Comcast SportsNet
LAS VEGAS (AP) -- Even dugouts and bullpens might not need that old landline soon.
Major League Baseball and T-Mobile announced Tuesday that the cellphone company will provide wireless devices that managers and pitching coaches can use to make the call to get relievers warming up.
The wireless phones will have docking stations in both sets of dugouts and bullpens, but managers and coaches can carry them. The signal shuts off if the phones are taken outside those areas.
The landline made headlines during Game 5 of the 2011 World Series when St. Louis manager Tony La Russa's instructions were misinterpreted by the bullpen coach and the Cardinals didn't have the right reliever ready to face Texas Rangers slugger Mike Napoli. A go-ahead hit led to a Texas victory, although the Cardinals bounced back to win Games 6 and 7 and take the title.
The wireless phones will automatically ring when pulled from the docking devices, and a swipe when the phone is being carried will make the call as well. Both sets of dugouts and bullpens will have antennas to transmit the signals.
T-Mobile and MLB Advanced Media also are working on other ways to improve digital content for smartphones and tablets. Mike Sievert, chief marketing officer for T-Mobile USA Inc., says digital consumption in baseball is strong and "today's baseball fan is technologically savvy and data hungry."

McAdam: Ridiculous to think Bradley's streak ended because he hit leadoff

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McAdam: Ridiculous to think Bradley's streak ended because he hit leadoff

BOSTON -- If you think John Farrell's decision to hit Jackie Bradley Jr. leadoff for one night is the reason Bradley's 29-game hit streak came to an end, I've got some swamp land you might be interested in buying.

Such silly talk first surfaced mid-afternoon when the lineup was announced. With Mookie Betts getting his first day off this season, somebody had to hit leadoff. Farrell went with the guy who was leading the league in hitting.

That sounds reasonable. But not to some, who cried that putting Bradley at the top was (take your pick) disrupting Bradley's routine, putting him in a place with which he wasn't familiar, or asking him to change his approach.

Of course, none of those made much sense.

First of all, Thursday night marked the sixth (SIXTH!) different spot that Bradley has hit during the hitting streak. He had hit second, sixth, seventh, eighth and ninth. So the notion that any change was disruptive was absurd.

As for the notion that Bradley would treat his at-bats differently because he was leading off? Also wrong. Bradley's major adjustment since spring training has been being aggressive early in the count. So, do you know how many pitches Bradley saw in four at-bats as the leadoff hitter? Eight.

Does that sound like someone who was being forced to be more patient for the night, or someone changing their approach by working the count more?

Finally, Bradley hit two balls on the screws -- one to the warning track in right, just in front of the bullpen in his first at-bat and another in front of the center field door, some 400 or so feet away, in his third.

Streaks come to an end, even when hitters belt the ball hard. Twice.