Boxing champ announces his retirement

784048.jpg

Boxing champ announces his retirement

From Comcast SportsNet
NEW YORK (AP) -- Boxer "Sugar" Shane Mosley is retiring, ending a career in which he won titles in three different weight classes, beat Oscar De La Hoya twice and never was knocked out. The 40-year-old announced on Twitter that he was hanging up his gloves, saying he "loved every moment of it. Win, lose or draw." Mosley lost three of his last four fights, including a dreary bout against Manny Pacquiao in May 2011 in which he mostly seemed to be avoiding the Filipino star in the ring. His last fight was May 5 on the undercard of the fight between Floyd Mayweather and Miguel Cotto. Mosley lost a lopsided decision to rising Mexican star Canelo Alvarez. The loss dropped his record to 46-8-1. Mosley began boxing at age 8 and wound up winning three U.S. Amateur titles and a bronze medal at the 1990 Goodwill Games. His professional career peaked when he won the WBC welterweight title by beating De La Hoya in 2000 before besting the popular fighter again in 2003 to claim the light middleweight title. Mosley also won the IBF lightweight belt in 1997 and was chosen fighter of the year by the Boxing Writers Association of America.

Ortiz: Yankees fans' booing 'wakes up the monster in me'

Ortiz: Yankees fans' booing 'wakes up the monster in me'

In his 1-on-1 interview with CSN Red Sox Insider Sean McAdam, David Ortiz thanks Yankees fans, ahead of his final series at Yankee Stadium, for the motivation they’ve given him throughout his Red Sox career. 

He expressed a similar sentiment in this post on The Players' Tribune website.

 

Stevens’ first practice observation: ‘We’re going to be able to fly around’

Stevens’ first practice observation: ‘We’re going to be able to fly around’

WALTHAM, Mass. –  Before the Celtics fully stretched prior to their first practice of the season, coach Brad Stevens had his players go 5-on-5 in a not-live breakdown while going at about 30 percent full speed or similar to what they would do in a walk-through.

“If that was 30 percent, we’re going to be able to fly around,” said Stevens. “I think it was just a misjudging of what 30 percent is. They were flying early on in practice. We have to be able to fully rotate, we have to guard different positions, you gotta be able to read the game instinctively and obviously there’s an athletic component that allows you to do so effectively.”

Regardless, the Celtics are a team that will rely more on their athleticism in past seasons in order to be effective and live up to the lofty expectations so many have for them this season.

“We have a real good team, real athletic at a lot of spots,” Celtics forward Amir Johnson told CSNNE.com. “We definitely got a couple more high-flyers in the building this year.”

He’s speaking about Gerald Green, a former Slam Dunk champion, and Jaylen Brown, who is considered one of the more athletic players among this year’s rookie class.

And that athleticism was indeed on display in the early moments of the team’s first practice of the season.

But what makes the Celtics a team that could potentially be a major player in the East, is that the increased athleticism is now married to a team whose skill level is underrated.

Talent and athleticism is certainly a bonus for any team.

But the Celtics know the road to being among the game’s elite is long and winding, a journey that they are just beginning to embark on right now.

And while there are plenty of directions that Stevens can put a greater focus on in these early days, it doesn’t appear the Celtics' leader will go that route.

“We’ve got a lot being installed,” Stevens said. “We’ll keep the emphasis on being a blue-collar team and playing together.”