BC hockey takes care of business against BU

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BC hockey takes care of business against BU

As much as things didnt go right for Boston College on Friday night in losing to Boston University in unfriendly territory, things all went the Eagles way in a 5-2 victory over the Terriers at Kelley Rink on Saturday night.

Needham native Bill Arnold potted a pair of power play goals for Boston College in a second period barrage, and BC head coach Jerry York matched the NCAA all-time record for wins with his 924th victory behind the bench. The four power play goals for the Eagles and the 36 shots on net to only 23 for Boston University revealed a pretty one-sided effort that turned into a special teams contest after a tightly played first period.

I think we were a little smarter and we worked a little harder, said York, comparing Saturday nights winning effort to the loss at Agganis Arena 24 hours earlier. Last night it was a battle of wills and BU had an edge on us in a lot of different categories. We were just that much better than we were last night whether it was loose pucks, goaltending or special teams. We were just that much better.

It looked like it might be a first period of frustration for Boston College when a Johnny Gaudreau sniped shot to the top corner was waved off because a BC skater bumped into Terriers goalie Matt OConner in the crease. But the top-ranked Eagles didnt let it throw them off.

Minutes later Eagles defenseman Teddy Doherty scored his first career collegiate goal on a rebound after power forward Kevin Hayes had drawn the BU defenses attention with a drive down the slot. Two minutes later it was BUs turn with Gaudreau in the box for hooking, and Terriers forward Wade Megan turning on the highlight reel machine.

Megan dangled through three Eagles skaters before dropping a pass to Sahir Gill at the doorstep. Gill found a wide open Cason Hohmann on the backdoor, and he tapped in the tying goal to leave things even after one period.

It was all Boston College after that. Arnold sandwiched a pair of rebound power play strikes around a Mike Matheson blast from the point, and the Eagles had a commanding 4-1 lead headed into the final 20 minutes. Wakefield native Brandon Silk and Evan Rodrigues traded goals for BC and BU respectively in the third period, and gave the Eagles the feel-good victory they were seeking in the home-and-home weekend series.

GOLD STAR: Bill Arnold is one of the lead forwards as a junior thats won some big games in his collegiate career, and he was a major factor in a giant win for Boston College. Arnold slammed home a couple rebound power play strikes in the second period by crashing the net, and won 12 of his first 15 draws in the face-off circle. While the Johnny Gaudreau, Steve Whitney and Pat Mullane top line for the Eagles rightly gets all the credit, Arnold now has six goals and 12 points in 13 games this season. Not too shabby at all for the 2010 fourth round pick of the Calgary Flames.

BLACK EYE: Matt Grzelcyk was sensational on Friday night in BUs win, but he was barely noticeable against the Eagles in Kelley Rink on Saturday night. The Bs third round pick had a pair of shots on net, but wasnt able to generate offensive chances like he did for his BU teammates 24 hours earlier. Grzelcyk also finished as an even defenseman, but was part of a Boston University defensemen corps that got manhandled around their own net by the big, strong determined Eagles forwards.

TURNING POINT: Boston University skaters Garrett Noonan and Alexx Privitera were whistled off for successive penalties in the second period with the Eagles holding a slim 2-1 lead, and BC blew the games doors off by cashing in on both ends of a 5-on-3 PP advantage. Michael Matheson whistled a point shot through traffic that eluded Matt OConnor and Arnold drilled home the carom of a Patrick Wey shot that didnt hit its mark. The quick power play barrage essentially ended the game before the third period had even begun.

BY THE NUMBERS: 6 the number of power play goals for both teams in a special teams extravaganza.

QUOTE TO NOTE: He has obviously changed everybody on the teams lives, so to be able to give something back to him and help set this record for him is something that we obviously wanted to do. Bill Arnold talking about making sure Jerry York got his NCAA record-tying 924th victory on home ice at the Heights.

Felger: Is the praise for Jacoby Brissett too good to be true?

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Felger: Is the praise for Jacoby Brissett too good to be true?

Three mid-week thoughts for your perusal . . . 

-- I was 100 percent behind the drafting of quarterback Jacoby Brissett. And then I read comments about the kid from Charlie Weis and Bill Parcells in Karen Guregian's excellent story in the Boston Herald on Tuesday.

Now I'm down to about 80 percent.

"He's a Curtis Martin-, Willie McGinest-, Troy Brown-type of player,'' said Parcells. "That's the kind of guy he is. That's what New England is getting. Those kind, those Tedy Bruschi types, those players who've been successful -- he's very similar in his personal life to those kinds of guys.''

"Let me tell you,'' added Weis, "this kid, from the time he was in high school, is the Pied Piper . . . He was definitely the leader of the pack. In the quarterback position, I think that's a critical factor. And that's what he was.''

Added Parcells: "He has zero personal issues.''

So why would glowing reports cause me to like the pick less? File under: Too good to be true.

I read those quotes and get the feeling I'm being sold something, which shakes my confidence a bit. Plus, it's a little too much on the intangible element. Character is certainly important at the position. In fact, it's crucial. But if intangibles were the only thing that mattered, Tim Tebow would have been an NFL QB. And we all know how that turned out.

Bottom line: I still like the pick. I still want the Pats drafting and developing quarterbacks. I just smell a bit of bull crap.

-- Chris Mannix nailed it regarding what it would take for the Celtics to lure Kevin Durant to Boston.

"Boston's ability to lure him is going to come down to who else they can get. You can't walk into a meeting with Kevin Durant and say, 'We've got Isiah Thomas and 97 draft picks; we're going to be good in a few years','' he told Toucher and Rich Tuesday morning. "Kevin doesn't want to hear that . . . What he wants to hear is that we're ready to win now . . . They have to come to the table with a Jimmy Butler, with a Bradley Beal, with an Al Horford. They can't just come with Brad Stevens, Danny Ainge and a bunch of draft picks.''

In other words, the pieces on the current roster aren't nearly as good as they looked in the regular season. And, no, Thomas is not a franchise player. And, finally, don't get too attached to those picks, no matter where the ping pong balls land.

-- I wonder if the Bruins look at the current landscape in net across the NHL playoffs and consider how wise it is to pay their goalie, Tuukka Rask, $7 million a year.

Still alive are guys like the Islanders' Thomas Greiss ($1.5 million cap hit), the Blues' Brian Ellliott ($2.5 million), the Sharks' Martin Jones ($3 million) and Penguins rookie Matt Murray ($620,000). Out are 8 of the top 10 highest-paid goalies in the league, a list including Henri Lundqvist, Carey Price, Cory Schneider, Ryan Miller and, of course, Rask.

Please note: No one is saying you can get away with shoddy goaltending in the playoffs. It's an unassailable fact that you need elite play in net to contend for Stanley Cups. The question is what you have to pay for it. 

And in that regard, this year is no aberration. Sometimes you have to pay through the nose for it, and sometimes it just falls in your lap.

Can the Bruins get away with trying to survive in that second camp? Good question. This much I know: Paying Rask $7 million a year to miss the playoffs two straight years isn't doing anyone any good.

Email Felger at mfelger@comcastsportsnet.com. Listen to Felger and Mazz weekdays, 2-6 p.m. on 98.5 FM. The simulcast runs daily on CSN.

Quotes, notes and stars: Red Sox 'capable of more' vs. lefties

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Quotes, notes and stars: Red Sox 'capable of more' vs. lefties

CHICAGO -- Quotes, Notes and Stars from the Red Sox' 4-1 loss to Chicago:

 

QUOTES:

"He's rarely in the middle of the plate. He pitches to the edge very effectively. He's got a number of different looks he can give you.'' - John Farrell on White Sox starter Jose Quintana.

"We have such a heavily righthand-hitting lineup, you would think that our guys would be able to handle the off-side pitching coming at them. . . We're capable of more.'' - Farrell on the Sox 0-3 record against lefty starters.

"He's done everything that we could have asked, to get deep into games and low run situations -- and not just this year. This goes back to when he was in the rotation last year.'' - Farrell on tough-luck loser Steven Wright.

"That's what I'm working for every time.'' - Carson Smith on his scoreless inning in his Red Sox debut.

"It is what it is. Keep working and try to be ready on whatever opportunities come. That's all I can say about that.'' - Chris Young, on the infrequency of lefty starters.

"A little frustrated with the walks. I gave them the second run with the walks. When I'm out there throwing 20 pitches an inning, it's hard to get into a rhythm.'' - Steven Wright.

 

NOTES

* The Red Sox have faced three lefty starters this season and are 0-3. They've managed two runs in 23 innings and hit just .108 (8-for-74) against them.

* When the opposition scores first, the Red Sox are 5-6 this season.

* Jackie Bradley Jr. extended his hitting streak to nine games with a sixth-inning single.

* Dating back to last season, Steven Wright hasn't allowed more than two earned runs in his last nine starts.

* Hanley Ramirez's homer in the fifth was his first since April 6, covering 96 at-bats.

 

STARS

1) Jose Quintana

Chicago's starter was brilliant, allowing a single run in eight innings on just four hits without issuing a walk.

2) Jose Abreu

The White Sox first baseman drove in three of the four White Sox runs with a first-inning triple and a two-run double in the eighth.

3) Steven Wright

Once again, the knuckballer got almost no run support and was stuck with the loss despite allowing just two runs in six innings.