And the Red Sox trash heap gets bigger


And the Red Sox trash heap gets bigger

By Justin Aucoin

Its going to be one hell of an offseason for the Boston Red Sox.

As soon as the Sox made their implosion complete the finger pointing started. Now the mudslinging and trash heaving is in full swing.

Yesterday, published an insight story into what was going on behind the scenes and in the Red Sox clubhouse. Minus the obvious bowing to the mighty Sox ownership, it gave some interesting tidbits into how dysfunctional the 2011 Red Sox truly were. And pretty sure the story is a watered down of what really went down, too. reporter Mike Giardi had his own little story on how poisonous the Red Sox clubhouse was. Its maddening if youre a Boston fan.

Both articles garnered a slew of reactions from fans and media alike. Fans were wondering why these stories didnt come out earlier; they want to know how such a screwed-up organization, always in spotlight, could keep its dirty socks hidden from the public eye all season long. Media personalities finally got some answers, too.

Chicken roasts and a slew of other madness. It now seems like us calling the Red Sox the MLBs version of "Animal House" is off base. Its at least 100x worse.

From the story:

The indifference of Beckett, Lester, and Lackey in a time of crisis can be seen in what team sources say became their habit of drinking beer, eating fast-food fried chicken, and playing video games in the clubhouse during games while their teammates tried to salvage a once-promising season.

Sounds like the Red Sox pitching staff were more geared toward playing adult softball than pitching in the MLB.

If thats their dream, maybe the Sox should let them chase it instead of stinking up Yawkey Way.

And as our buddy @gorskic said yesterday, Beckett & Co. are probably solely responsible for keeping the Boston Popeyes in business.

After a long, super hard, endoftheworld road trip, John Henry decided to bring the team onto his yacht to hang back, relax and be cool.

The owners responded by giving all the players 300 headphones and inviting them to enjoy a players-only night on principal owner John W. Henrys yacht after they returned from a road trip Sept. 11.

2011 Red Sox: On a boat and out of the playoffs

Yet, that obviously wasnt enough to sooth the teams inflating egos and waistlines.

Boston.coms article also makes Terry Francona look like a cross between Amy Whinehouse and Michael Jackson. Seriously.


Team sources also expressed concern that Franconas performance may have been affected by his use of pain medication, which he also vehemently denied. Francona said he has taken pain medicine for many years, particularly after multiple knee surgeries. He said he used painkillers after knee surgery last October and used them during the season to relieve the discomfort of doctors draining blood from his knee at least five times.

Sounds innocent enough. Everyone has one family member whos a walking pharmacy. But these team sources want you to think Tito is trying out for "Scarface".

In reality, its probably more like this:

Yet for all the crap tossing by team sources and management, somehow the Red Sox owners come out of the fray without a speck of poo on their fine Gucchi suits. They claim they were generally unaware of how deeply damaged the Sox had become until after the season.

Smell that?

Listen, Francona mightve been able to keep the teams trash swept under the carpet and away from the prying eyes of the media but from ownership, too? Thats unbelievable. This hear no evil, see no evil is BS. You dont have as much money as the Red Sox have invested into its employees and not pay attention to whats going on off and on the field.

And if it is true if John Henry and his minions were completely oblivious to what was going on with their team they need to get grilled for it. They need to take responsibility. Its their team. Its their business venture. Theyre no more innocent than anyone wearing the Sox jersey.

They need a little crap on their suits, too. Which team source will help throw the first piece of dung? There seems to be plenty to go around.

Young understands work isn't done after claiming Celtics final roster spot

Young understands work isn't done after claiming Celtics final roster spot

WALTHAM, Mass. – For so many years the game of basketball came easy – almost too easy – for James Young.

He stood out on a young Kentucky team that played at the highest levels, delivering the kind of performances as an 18-year-old college freshman that catapulted him into the first round of the NBA draft.

To be so young and already having achieved a childhood dream, to be in the NBA, Young was too young to realize how quickly the dream could become a nightmare if he didn't put in the necessary work.

The past couple of weeks have not been easy for Young, aware that the Celtics were torn as to whether they should keep him around this season or waive him.

They choose the former and instead waived his now-ex teammate R.J. Hunter, on Hunter’s 23rd birthday no less.

One of the first acts Young said he planned to do following Monday's practice was to reach out to Hunter, offer words of encouragement to a player he looked upon as a brother, a brother who is in a state of basketball limbo right now which could have easily been the latest chapter in James Young’s basketball narrative.

And that’s why as happy as Young is to still be donning the Green and White, his work towards proving himself to this team, to this franchise is far from done.

You listen to veterans like Jae Crowder, a second-round pick who has come up the hard way in the NBA, they speak of how Young now takes the game more serious.

Even Young acknowledged that he didn’t take the NBA game and the need to work at staying in the league as serious as he should have initially.

“I wasn’t playing as hard (early on),” Young admitted. “I just was satisfied being where I was, being too comfortable. My confidence was down. I have to change that around.”

Crowder, a straight-no-chaser kind of fellow, said as much when I asked him about the changes he has seen in Young.

“He’s taking stuff a little more serious,” Crowder said. “It’s growing up. He came in as a first-round draft pick and was on the borderline of getting cut. I don’t know what else is going to wake you up.”

That’s part of what made this decision so difficult and on some levels, left players with mixed emotions about the decision.

For those of us who followed this team through training camp, there was no question that Young had the better camp.

But the one thing that was never questioned with Hunter, was his work ethic. He made his share of mistakes and missed more shots than a player with a sharpshooter's reputation should, but you never got a sense it had anything to do with him not working as hard as he needed to.

That was among the more notable issues with Young who came into the league as an 18-year-old. That youth probably worked for him as opposed to Hunter who played three years of college basketball and was expected to be seemingly more NBA-ready.

Even though Hunter’s NBA future is on uncertain ground now, he’s too young and too talented to not get at least one more crack with an NBA team.

And by Boston waiving him, he really does become a low-risk, high-reward prospect that an NBA team might want to take a closer look at with their club. 

And Young remains a Celtic, doing all that he can to climb up the pecking order which now has him as the clear-cut 15th man on the roster.

He might see more minutes than rookie Demetrius Jackson and possibly second-year forward Jordan Mickey, but Young’s future with the Boston Celtics is still on relatively thin ice.

“I told him this morning, this might be the first time he’s earned anything in his life,” said Danny Ainge, Boston’s president of basketball operations.  “He earned this by his play, day-in and day-out. He was given a lot as a young kid with a lot of promise, a lot of potential. We talked about earlier this summer, he had to come out and win a spot with some good competition and he did. He needs to keep doing what he’s doing.”

More than anything else, Young has been consistent in his effort, overall energy and attention to detail. But it remains to be seen if Young has done all that to just secure a roster spot, or has he truly grown up and figured out what has to be done in order to be an NBA player.